Tag: water infrastructure

What Will it Take to Rebuild Modern Water Infrastructure in the US?

This is a guest post by Bill Eller currently serves as Vice President, Business Development at HomeServe. Rebuilding water infrastructure will require sustainable investment in local projects; strong local-federal partnerships; and flexible financing strategies. America’s cities are at the forefront of both funding and design of the infrastructure of our country’s future, and that is

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In 2019, Cities Renew Focus on Rebuilding America’s Infrastructure

The start of 2019 welcomed the 116th Congress to our nation’s capital and brought a renewed opportunity to make meaningful legislative gains on behalf of American communities and residents. Unfortunately, the federal government shutdown has dominated the policy conversations in Washington and caused a ripple of consequences across the country. The National League of Cities

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Shutdown Impacts: Water Infrastructure, Environment and Public Lands

This week, the House is set to vote on a standalone bill to fund the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – a bill that passed both chambers of Congress last Summer. This bill, which largely mirrors the Senate-passed bill, will reopen our national parks and provide important funding for

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Water Resources Bill is a Win for Cities

This week, Congress sent the president a comprehensive bipartisan water infrastructure bill. America’s Water Infrastructure Act (S. 3021) passed the House by voice vote and passed the Senate by a vote of 99-1. In a tense political climate leading up to the mid-term elections, the strong support for the bill in both chambers shows that

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Financing the New Water Infrastructure

This is a guest post by Cynthia Koehler, executive director of the WaterNow Alliance. When it comes to addressing the nation’s water infrastructure crisis, cities and towns are ground zero. They account for 80% or more of spending on drinking water, stormwater and wastewater nationwide, as federal and state support for these vital public services have

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Three Things Local Officials Should Know About Water Infrastructure

This is a guest post from Bill Eller, Vice President, Business Development at HomeServe. Today, local officials face a problem decades in the making: aging water infrastructure systems and the costs of repair and replacement. Much of the country’s one million miles of water lines are approaching — or have already exceeded — the end of

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Now Is the Time to Act on Infrastructure

The 115th Congress has the opportunity to leverage unprecedented public and bipartisan support to address our nation’s infrastructure challenges, and we will have a pivotal opportunity in the coming year to turn the tide. This is a guest post by Rep. Garret Graves. America’s infrastructure was recently reviewed by the American Society of Civil Engineers,

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Aging Infrastructure Stalls Greatness

Local governments need a federal commitment and partner to improve our water, transportation and broadband systems. America cannot continue to be great without world-class infrastructure. This is a guest post by Mayor Sal Panto, Jr. The nation’s local leaders know that our nation’s infrastructure has never been a partisan issue. Today, with ailing infrastructure and

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Resilient Infrastructure and Energy Savings to be Focus of 3rd Annual National Mayor’s Challenge for Water Conservation, April 1-30

This post was written by Steve Creech, Executive Director of the Wyland Foundation. The facts about water shortages are indisputable. Yet, by and large, we tend to think of these shortages as temporary problems, without giving thought to the fact that a changing climate, growing populations, an aging water delivery infrastructure and increasing demands for

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Government Shutdown Puts America’s Waterways in Jeopardy

It’s now day two of the federal government shutdown, and many city leaders and residents are still wondering what the impact will be on their communities. Certainly, the shuttering of national parks throughout the country as well as the Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo here in Washington, DC (not to mention the Panda Cam!)

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