Tag: transportation

Balancing Policy and Technology in Kansas City

There is nothing new in the world. In ancient times, when the invading hoard is approaching the city, the wise leader sends an emissary through the front gate to parley. In today’s economy, these same tactics can be employed by cities seeking to quickly gain an understanding of what a startup is proposing, how that proposal

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For a Smooth Ride, e-Scooter Providers and Cities Need to Get Along

This is a guest post by Steve DelBianco, president of NetChoice. America’s tech industry has embraced the idea of permissionless innovation, where new online business models set up operations without requesting approval from public officials. That’s how eBay revolutionized the way people sell their stuff, and it’s how sharing economy businesses became a great way for

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Is Your City Ready to BUILD Like a TIGER This Summer?

This week, the US Department of Transportation (USDOT) held its first of several webinars on the rebranded Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grants — which have been rebranded as the Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development grants (BUILD) grants. These grants have been exceedingly popular with cities in the past to fund innovative and multimodal projects

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America’s Infrastructure Should Be Beautiful

“If anything can save the world,” North Face and Esprit founder Doug Tompkins once said, “I’d put my money on beauty.” This year, as part of a new campaign called And Beauty For All, we’re challenging NLC and its member communities to put that hypothesis to the test. We believe that, as our cities work on

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President Trump, Rebuild With Us

This is a staff post by Irma Esparza Diggs, senior executive and director of federal advocacy at the National League of Cities. Tonight, President Trump gives his first State of the Union address to Congress, and city leaders across the country will be watching to hear how the president plans to fulfill his campaign promise

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How Toronto Gets Urban Housing and Zoning Right

This is a guest post by Nick Norris, planning director for the city of Salt Lake City. It was 6 a.m. and I couldn’t sleep. The outside temperature was 16 degrees Fahrenheit (that’s -9 degrees Celsius). “I can do this,” I said as I put on my cold weather running gear. Up until that point, my

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“Imagine Austin” Uses Data to Bring City’s Vision To Life

This is a guest post by Natale LaBarbera, an open data advocate and account manager at Socrata.  What is the City of Austin’s self-proclaimed greatest asset? Its people. In fact, thousands of community members teamed together to create Imagine Austin, a comprehensive plan for how the City hopes to grow and advance in 30-years. Now

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What American Cities Can Learn From Toronto’s Success

Last month, representatives from four NLC member cities — Columbus, Ohio, Richmond, Virginia, Salt Lake City, and Tucson, Arizona — traveled to Toronto, Ontario for a study tour. With a population of 2,800,000, Toronto is North America’s fourth-largest city — and the  community is working to cope with explosive growth (fueled in part by immigration),

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Why Cities Struggle to Fund Infrastructure

As President Trump and Congressional leadership emerge from a strategy meeting at Camp David this week, the infrastructure debate is heating up. There is now little doubt: Trump, Ryan, and McConnell are expected to announce that they intend to prioritize infrastructure on their 2018 to-do list. For cities, the coming focus on America’s long infrastructure

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Cities Are Leading on Infrastructure. Now Congress Needs to Catch Up.

To improve our nation’s infrastructure, cities need the freedom to explore innovative financing tools — but they also need a renewed commitment from their partners at the state and federal levels of government. This is a guest post by Councilmember James McDonald. As federal and state funding for infrastructure has become less predictable, the stress

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