Tag: Technology

Mayors: A Responsive City Needs Great Internet Access

This is a guest post by Susan Crawford. A recent Webby Awards/Harris Interactive poll found that consumers – constituents, in other words – have come to expect real-time tracking, same-day delivery, and the opportunity to provide instant feedback regarding every service and business they encounter. 80 percent of respondents said they expect payments to be handled

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How to Boost Your City’s Visibility

“Technology doesn’t have to be expensive.” That’s what the sales people tell us. These words trigger the warning bell in our heads. But sometimes it turns out to be true, as the city leaders in Lewiston, Maine (pop. 36,600) discovered in their partnership with NLC Corporate Partner CGI Communications. Prominent on the city’s website is

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Citizen Engagement Means More than Just Voting

Democracy. In the very root of the word is the notion that it is the people who rule. It is engrained in all Americans that in our country, government is by the people and for the people. Of course, for this to be true, the people must be involved. Citizens must be actively engaged in

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Advancements in Data-Sharing Are Changing How Government is Run

On May 30th and 31st, innovators in government and technology joined together for the 5th annual Transparency Camp, led by the Washington, D.C. based Sunlight Foundation. Throughout the two-day event, conversation revolved around the dual concepts of government and data, exploring their interconnected nature and the rapid advancements in data that are changing the way

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WUF7: City Resiliency — Facing the Reality of Natural and Man Made Disasters

This is the sixth post in a series of blogs on the World Urban Forum 7 in Medellin, Colombia. Throughout the week long meeting of the World Urban Forum in Medellin, Colombia, there was clear agreement: Our climate is changing, temperatures are increasing, sea levels are rising, droughts are worsening, storms are becoming more violent, fires are

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What It Takes to Cluster

This is a guest post written by Daria Siegel, Director of Launch LM and Andrew Breslau, Downtown Alliance Senior Vice President of Communications and Marketing. It seems everybody these days wants a “tech cluster.” Municipalities across the country are repositioning themselves as tech friendly in hopes of capturing some of the promise the industry might

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Cities Kick-Start Innovation

Context matters in rankings, whether it is for universities, sports teams or cities. Columbus, Ohio and Medellin, Columbia, are two cities that were recently singled out for recognition. In the case of Medellin the title bestowed was Innovative City of the Year by Citi Group, The Wall Street Journal and the Urban Land Institute. Columbus

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The Latest in Economic Development

This week’s blog discusses the many reasons for America’s persistent unemployment problem, explores New York City’s ambitious bet on an “innovation economy,” looks at an emerging market for microlenders, and highlights the changing environment for America’s malls. Comment below or send to common@nlc.org. Get the last edition of “The Latest in Economic Development” here. In

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Latest in Economic Development

This week’s Latest in Economic Development highlights challenges with worker training, New York’s economic diversity, New Orleans’s mini tech boom, and trends in economic attraction.  Have things to add, contact me at mcconnell@nlc.org. Get the last edition of “The Latest in Economic Development” here. Public universities are not sufficiently preparing students to enter the workforce,

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Innovation and Cities: Reframing the Dialogue

The first installment in a series on “Innovation and Cities” These are tough times for cities, economically and politically.  Our own research points to a period of managed retrenchment where city leaders are confronted with undesirable choices — cuts in vital services, laying off personnel, delaying needed infrastructure investments, to name a few.  But, times

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