Tag: supreme court cases local government

SCOTUS Rules Employers May Be Sued for Sex Orientation and Gender Identity Discrimination

On Monday, in a 6-3 decision in Bostock v. Clayton County, the Supreme Court held that gay and transgender employees may sue their employers under Title VII for discriminating against them because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlaws employment discrimination on the basis of

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DACA Survives… For Now

In a 5-4 decision in DHS v. Regents of the University of California, the Supreme Court held that the decision to wind-down the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program violated the Administrative Procedures Act (APA). It is possible the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will try again to end DACA. DACA was established by

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Despite COVID-19, SCOTUS Refuses to Stop Use of New Public Charge Definition

The Supreme Court refused to lift its stay of federal court orders that prevented the Trump administration from making changes to the definition of public charge. Immigrants who are deemed a “public charge” are ineligible to receive green cards/lawful permanent resident status. The most recent definition of public charge, adopted in 1999, included immigrants who

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Local Governments Respond to Car Impounding SCOTUS Case

The State and Local Legal Center (SLLC) has filed an amicus brief in City of Chicago, Illinois v. Fulton, an important case for local governments. The City of Chicago impounds vehicles when debtors have three or more unpaid fines. When Robbin Fulton’s vehicle was impounded for this reason, she filed for bankruptcy and asked the

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Robocall Case Has Important Implications for Local Governments

What does Barr v. American Association of Political Consultants have to do with state and local governments? The question the Supreme Court will decide in this case is whether allowing robocalls for government-debt only violates the First Amendment. State and local governments aren’t likely recipients of such calls. In one word the answer is Reed; as in Reed v. Town

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For Now, Supreme Court Won’t Review Flint Water Crisis Case

The Flint water crisis was one of the more notable events of the last decade. Unsurprisingly, it led to litigation. So far, the Sixth Circuit has refused to dismiss the case against a number of the state and local government officials who were sued. This week, the Supreme Court refused to hear their case challenging

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SCOTUS Allows Public Charge Rules to Go into Effect Temporarily

The Supreme Court has stayed a nationwide injunction which disallowed the public charge rule from going into effect anywhere in the United States. For now, the public charge rule will remain in effect across the country (except in Illinois) until the Second Circuit, and the Supreme Court, if it decides to get involved, rules in

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Why the Census is Headed To SCOTUS

For more on how to prepare your city for the 2020 census visit NLC.org/census. In March 2018 Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross issued a memorandum stating a citizenship question would be added to the 2020 census questionnaire. In In Re Department of Commerce the Supreme Court will not be deciding whether this question may be

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Supreme Court Review for Local Governments: June 2017

In the last month of its term (June), the Supreme Court often issues opinions at a dizzying pace. Below is a very brief summary of the cases decided last month affecting local governments. When it comes to big cases, the Supreme Court’s last term was the quietest in recent memory. For local governments, though, the

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Seven Significant Supreme Court Cases for Local Governments

The Supreme Court ruled on a number of cases this term that will affect local governments. (markphariss/Getty Images) That same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marry and the Affordable Care Act remains intact will forever outshine every other decision from this Supreme Court term. But local governments will ignore the rest of this term

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