Tag: revitalization

Three Ways to Build a Best Practices Toolkit

Whether you’re a newly elected official or an experienced hand, learning from fellow city leaders and building a best a practices toolkit is part of the job. And at the National Black Caucus of Local Elected Officials (NBC-LEO) 2018 Summer Conference, best practices are the name of the game. Hosted in Hollywood, Florida, this July

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In Detroit, Neighborhood Redevelopment Starts With “Trusting Your Gut”

Last Monday, the City of Detroit emerged from Chapter 9 Bankruptcy — nearly five years after it filed for the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. The June 2013 filing came at what was perhaps the nadir of the city’s spirits, battered by decades of population and jobs losses. A few months after the filing, the

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Can Columbus, Ohio Become a Model for Equitable Community Development?

In many ways, the city of Columbus, Ohio, is an outlier among its peers. It’s the most populous city in Ohio (with 886,000 residents) — despite Cleveland and Cincinnati being perhaps better known — and its metropolitan area, with 2.1 million, leads the Buckeye State as well. And unlike many other cities in America’s so-called

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Can Tucson, Arizona Bring Back its Miracle Mile?

In cities, certain neighborhoods may have a history that gave them an economic purpose, a distinctive aesthetic identity, and unique role in their city decades ago — even if time has moved on. When those neighborhoods fall on hard times, that identity can sour from a source of pride to one of perceived blight. And

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In Clifton Forge, Virginia, an Arts and Preservation Success Story

While America’s major metropolitan cities have taken center stage in cultural debates, the nation’s smaller cities and towns have a culture, vibrancy and uniqueness all their own. Even as big urban centers are introducing high-tech ideas for governing, there is much creativity and dynamic problem-solving going on in communities with populations fewer than 50,000 residents.

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