Tag: poverty

New NLC Task Force to Focus on Expanding Economic Opportunity

Launched by NLC President Matt Zone, the task force will pursue a three-pronged strategy over the next year that will include municipal engagement and peer learning, documentation of promising and emerging city approaches, and education and training for city officials. This post was co-authored by Courtney Coffin and Heidi Goldberg. “Cities are where hope meets

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Let’s All Climb to the Mountaintop: NLC Commemorates the Birthday of Dr. King

Today, we celebrate the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who would be 85 years old if he were still alive today.  Across the country, businesses, governments, and schools are closed to allow people to celebrate the memory of one of history’s most important figures. Dr. King is a towering figure whose commitment to

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What $24 Billion Means to Cities

According to Standard & Poor’s, the cost of the 16-day federal government shutdown was $24 billion.  Twenty-four billion dollars! Twenty-four billion dollars can make a huge difference to cities and the people who live in them.  To drive home the point, I’d like to show you how that same $24 billion could be spent over

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Lessons Learned from Richmond, Virginia to Improve the Lives of Veterans Everywhere

In September 2012, in conjunction with the Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity, NLC sponsored an event that highlighted the work that the City of Richmond, VA is doing to alleviate poverty. As part of the “Cities Promote Opportunity” series, Mayor Dwight C. Jones, Richmond, spoke about the importance of city leadership and service coordination in

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Book Review: Confronting Suburban Poverty in America

Inner-city slums.  Rural isolation.  The affluent suburbs.  For decades, these terms have demarcated the mental boundaries of our nation’s collective understanding of the geography of poverty and wealth in America. Yet this geography has been changing rapidly in recent years – and neither our perceptions nor our poverty reduction policies are keeping pace. In a

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