Tag: Love My City

Stewarding our Legacy Cities

In the center of Akron, Ohio’s newly developed main street, the city has plans to build a rubber statue. Not literally, of course. Instead, the city will honor its “Rubber City” roots with a 12-foot bronze statue of a rubber worker holding a finished tire. In a news release, Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan said the

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To Columbus, With Love

Dear Columbus, Columbus… America’s Opportunity City… Ohio’s capital… Our home. For my whole life you have been a place that inspires, challenges, and fights. You are a city that is rich in history and poised for a continued vibrant future. As a product of Columbus City Schools, I know the opportunities you provide for all

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Los Angeles: My City, and City to the World

This is a guest post by Greg McGrath, Southern California Regional President, Clear Channel Outdoor Americas Los Angeles is my home. It’s a city that offers something for everyone. And it’s an abundance of diversity that is “home to the world.” Our communities wear their culture on their sleeves and our streets tell our city’s storied

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Rochester, New York – A Legacy of its Own

I was born and raised in Rochester, NY, a legacy city historically famous for being the birthplace of companies like Cunningham Stage Coach, Bausch and Lamb, Eastman Kodak Co. and Xerox.  First dubbed the “Young Lion of the West” thanks to our Erie Canal, we were one of America’s first boomtowns. Later, Rochester was referred

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Three Ways Scranton Is Rebuilding Its Legacy

This is guest post by Bill Eller, vice president, business development at HomeServe. Scranton, Pennsylvania is known as “the Electric City,” and in recent years, it has become a poster child for legacy cities and efforts of revitalization. Facing decline since its height in the 1950s, Scranton has recently become home to a vibrant arts

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Why Legacy Cities Matter for America’s Future

The neighborhood where I grew up, and where I still live today, has seen it all. Settled by German and Irish immigrants in the early 1800s, the Detroit-Shoreway neighborhood in Cleveland’s lower West side soon became a hub for people drawn to jobs created by the bustling factories sprouting along the Erie Canal. As canals

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