Tag: immigration

Why the 2020 Census Could Be a Problem for Cities

This is a guest post by Mayor Mark Stodola, Little Rock, Arkansas, president of the National League of Cities. This Tuesday, the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Oversight and Government Reform heard testimony from the U.S. Census Bureau’s interim director. He provided an overview of how preparations for the 2020 decennial census are going

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In the Senate, Immigration Reform Hits a Wall

This week, the Senate took up debate on immigration reform, a long-awaited moment for both this chamber and the country. On the table were several politically charged issues, including both the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and President Trump’s proposed border wall. But after a week of unsuccessful bargaining and a series of

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What a Citizenship Question on the Census Would Mean for Cities

There is no question that America’s city leaders share Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross’s commitment to a full and fair 2020 Census. Census data is vital to cities for uses including regional planning, economic research, public health initiatives, and allocating more than $600 billion in federal funding to state and local governments. But because city leaders understand

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In Letter, Department of Justice Again Challenges “Sanctuary Jurisdictions”

Once again, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has sent letters to 23 jurisdictions (fourteen cities, six counties and three states) demanding proof that each jurisdiction is not restricting the sharing of citizenship or immigration status information by its law enforcement officers or other government officials with federal immigration authorities. The DOJ is accusing these jurisdictions

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Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Legal Challenges to Third Travel Ban

In Trump v. Hawaii, the Ninth Circuit temporarily struck down President Trump’s third travel ban. Because of a Supreme Court order issued in December 2017, however, the third travel ban is currently in effect, regardless of the Ninth Circuit ruling. Now, the Supreme Court has agreed to review the Ninth Circuit decision — and an

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Judge Orders Trump Administration to Temporarily Maintain DACA

A federal district court has issued a temporary nationwide injunction requiring the Trump administration to maintain much of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Four states (California, Maine, Maryland, and Minnesota) and two local governments (San Jose and Santa Clara County) are among the plaintiffs who sued the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

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Ninth Circuit Temporarily Strikes Down Third Travel Ban

When, last month, the Ninth Circuit issued an opinion temporarily striking down President Trump’s third travel ban, the move was met with little fanfare. There are two likely reasons. First, the decision came down right before Christmas (December 22). And in early December, the Supreme Court allowed the third travel ban to go into effect until

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Court Permanently Strikes Down Trump Sanctuary Cities Order

In April, a federal district court issued a nationwide preliminary injunction preventing the Trump administration from enforcing the sanctuary jurisdictions portion of the Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States executive order (EO). Now, the same federal court has made that injunction permanent — effectively halting enforcement until further notice. According to

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What City Leaders Have to Say About Diversity

This is a guest post by Janelle Watson, NLC’s Senior Associate for Constituency Group Programs. The National League of Cities celebrates the growing diversity of America’s cities and towns. That’s why NLC and its Constituency Groups created the City Cultural Diversity Awards: to recognize the communities across the country that are creating inclusive environments for of

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Will the Supreme Court Review Trump’s Third Travel Ban?

If Attorney General Jeff Sessions has his way, the answer will be yes. Or at least, so Sessions told the Senate Judiciary Committee — shortly after two federal district courts temporarily prevented the third travel ban from going into effect. But the full story is more complicated. Back on March 6, President Trump signed an executive

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