Tag: immigration

DACA Survives… For Now

In a 5-4 decision in DHS v. Regents of the University of California, the Supreme Court held that the decision to wind-down the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program violated the Administrative Procedures Act (APA). It is possible the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will try again to end DACA. DACA was established by

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Despite COVID-19, SCOTUS Refuses to Stop Use of New Public Charge Definition

The Supreme Court refused to lift its stay of federal court orders that prevented the Trump administration from making changes to the definition of public charge. Immigrants who are deemed a “public charge” are ineligible to receive green cards/lawful permanent resident status. The most recent definition of public charge, adopted in 1999, included immigrants who

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New Presidential Proclamation Limits Green Cards Temporarily

When President Trump tweeted that he intended to temporarily suspend immigration into the United States due to COVID-19 no one quite knew what to expect. The presidential proclamation prevents foreign nationals who are outside of the United States now and for the next 60 days (possibly longer if the proclamation is extended) from applying for legal permanent

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COVID-19 Guidance for Immigrant Rich Communities

Communities with large immigrant populations may be at risk for greater exposure to COVID-19 because of new rules that have been implemented by the Trump Administration. These rules include increased enforcement efforts to remove all undocumented immigrants, implementation of stricter public charge rules and closure of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) offices which process

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SCOTUS Allows Public Charge Rules to Go into Effect Temporarily

The Supreme Court has stayed a nationwide injunction which disallowed the public charge rule from going into effect anywhere in the United States. For now, the public charge rule will remain in effect across the country (except in Illinois) until the Second Circuit, and the Supreme Court, if it decides to get involved, rules in

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Why the 2020 Census Could Be a Problem for Cities

This is a guest post by Mayor Mark Stodola, Little Rock, Arkansas, president of the National League of Cities. This Tuesday, the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Oversight and Government Reform heard testimony from the U.S. Census Bureau’s interim director. He provided an overview of how preparations for the 2020 decennial census are going

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In the Senate, Immigration Reform Hits a Wall

This week, the Senate took up debate on immigration reform, a long-awaited moment for both this chamber and the country. On the table were several politically charged issues, including both the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and President Trump’s proposed border wall. But after a week of unsuccessful bargaining and a series of

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What a Citizenship Question on the Census Would Mean for Cities

There is no question that America’s city leaders share Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross’s commitment to a full and fair 2020 Census. Census data is vital to cities for uses including regional planning, economic research, public health initiatives, and allocating more than $600 billion in federal funding to state and local governments. But because city leaders understand

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In Letter, Department of Justice Again Challenges “Sanctuary Jurisdictions”

Once again, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has sent letters to 23 jurisdictions (fourteen cities, six counties and three states) demanding proof that each jurisdiction is not restricting the sharing of citizenship or immigration status information by its law enforcement officers or other government officials with federal immigration authorities. The DOJ is accusing these jurisdictions

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Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Legal Challenges to Third Travel Ban

In Trump v. Hawaii, the Ninth Circuit temporarily struck down President Trump’s third travel ban. Because of a Supreme Court order issued in December 2017, however, the third travel ban is currently in effect, regardless of the Ninth Circuit ruling. Now, the Supreme Court has agreed to review the Ninth Circuit decision — and an

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