Tag: government efficiency

5 Ways Cities Can Use Data to Become More Efficient and Effective

“Data and technology” was identified as one of the top 10 issues mayors were prioritizing in their 2018 state of the city speeches. It’s easy to see why: data can help cities become more efficient and better able to deliver services and solve problems. Cities large and small are leveraging data and facts to solve

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Performance Management Strategies for Cities of All Sizes

This is a guest post by Brian Aylward, association manager for Tyler Technologies. Performance management was a hot topic recently at Socrata Connect. The most common feeling among the municipal staff, leaders and visionaries in attendance was a conflicting context of increased expectations and limited resources. One way for city leaders and staff to thrive

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Open Data Is Finally Making A Dent In Cities

This post originally appeared on Fast Company’s Co.Exist blog. What is the best way to get from 12th Street to Main, and should I take the subway, a bike, or rideshare? How many lobbyists are there in my city and more importantly, what are they doing? And, by the way, where did my dog go?

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The Great Leadership Divide

While the U.S. government is stalled and wallowing in its own political dysfunction, I spent last week in the midst of some 3,000 movers and shakers representing the municipal movement on a world-wide scale. These city leaders and professional staff from national municipal associations were gathered in Rabat, Morocco for the World Summit of Local

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Are Cities Helping Turn the Tide in America’s Fight Against Childhood Obesity?

The good news:  After increasing for more than three decades, we are beginning to see childhood obesity rates fall in some states and communities.  The bad news is that these improvements are not reaching every city, town, and county. Earlier this month, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the White House celebrated important milestones

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Strategies for Transforming the “Rust Belt”

Many cities, especially the old manufacturing centers hardest hit by economic transformation and demographic shifts, are developing and implementing strategies to attract new residents and new investment. Options that have been or are being deployed to once again grow these cities include targeting immigrants and knowledge workers (“creative class”) as well as place-based initiatives focusing

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Keeping a Small Town Thriving

Shepherdstown, West Virginia (population under 2,000) matches the historic charm of a Shenandoah Valley retreat with the energy and entrepreneurship usually found in a more urban setting. In the competition for best in class among small communities, Shepherdstown punches above its size and weight. Ignore the pre-Revolutionary founding (1762) and the advantages of geography (77

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Broken Politics Does Not Diminish the Value of Government

A startling NBC/Wall Street Journal poll (January 22-24, 2012) indicates that 80 percent of Americans disapprove the job performance of Congress. Indeed, attitudes about government generally, whether Congress, the President, cabinet departments or agencies, are generally unfavorable. Research work conducted by Public Works Partners www.publicworkspartners.net illuminates a bit more of the truth behind these figures.

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The Latest in Economic Development – 1.3.12

A full Latest in Economic Development will return from its holiday hiatus next week, but in the meantime we wanted to briefly post about Mario Polèse’s City Journal article “Urban Development Legends.”  If you’re into economic development, it’s a must read.  The article offers a critique of the major economic development theories for the past

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Technology Wars Yield Efficiencies for Cities

Pick up nearly any magazine devoted to business, finance, technology or consumers and you will learn the details of the war being waged by corporate kingpins Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook. Ostensibly this competition is supposed to be good for the average consumer whether individual or corporate. This assumes of course that the average consumer

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