Tag: FCC

Three Reasons Why Net Neutrality Matters for Cities

On November 22, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai announced plans to roll back net neutrality regulations. The current regulations, which were adopted by the FCC in 2015, classified internet service as a “telecommunications service,” and required that all internet traffic be treated equally, without blocking, throttling (slowing down), or paid prioritization (so-called “fast

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Broadband in the United States

It isn’t new news that the United States lags in broadband adoption and download speeds.  The United States was one of the world leaders on broadband penetration in the 1990s, ranking fourth among other developed and developing nations.  But by 2006, the U.S.’s standing slipped drastically, according to the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development,

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I have high-speed, do you?

A recent Washington Post[1] article reported that almost 40 percent of Americans do not have high-speed Internet access at home. What is most interesting about the 40 percent statistic is that, even in places where broadband is available, not everyone subscribes to it.  While some urban households just don’t have the adequate computer components, a

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FCC Gives Cities A Preview of Broadband Plan

During a meeting of local elected officials, Blair Levin, executive director of the Federal Communications Commission, Omnibus Broadband Initiative gave a sneak peak at the soon to be released National Broadband Plan. “Broadband is the common medium this country uses…’ he said during the meeting, underlying the need for a stronger technological infrastructure that would

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