Tag: equity

How New Orleans Prioritized Equity In Fighting COVID-19

On The Frontlines is a joint project between NLC and IGNITE Cities In the ‘Big Easy,’ where life has always moved at its own pace, Mayor LaToya Cantrell had to make a quick decision to slow the economic and social pace of her city when it was discovered as a hotspot for COVID-19. As confirmations

Continue reading

City Leaders Call for Data Disaggregation in COVID-19 Response

The legacy of structural racism from redlining, urban renewal, and other local, state, and federal policies has led to generations of disinvestment and hazardous environments in communities of color, especially Black communities. It has become clear that the COVID-19 crisis continues to exacerbate racial inequities in health and healthcare access resulting from this legacy.   Rochester Mayor Provides Example of Leadership  Mayor Lovely Warren of Rochester,

Continue reading

Disparate Impacts of COVID-19 on Communities of Color

As local leaders respond to this COVID-19 pandemic, government decision-makers and decision-making processes will be tested in unprecedented ways. Now, more than ever, these decisions cannot only consider equity as one piece of many; they must center on equity. Without applying an explicit equity lens to each city’s COVID-19 response, the response is likely to perpetuate or exacerbate existing inequities for people of color, low-income individuals, people with disabilities, the LGBTQIA+ community, and other vulnerable

Continue reading

Retooling Criminal Justice Responses for Equity and Continued Public Safety

Cities have already begun to alter arrest and detention practices in order to support social or physical distancing and related measures in response to COVID-19. In many cases, these alterations continue efforts underway to retool local public safety efforts to rely less on high and disproportionate arrest and incarceration rates. Sustained momentum with such practices will reduce risks for several groups:   The nation’s three million first responders;   Persons experiencing mental health crises, substance use disorder issues, and homelessness, who might otherwise go to jail;  

Continue reading

Prioritize Equity in COVID-19 Response

These are unprecedented times. However, it is important to speak up and ensure that equity is not being overlooked as leaders and community advocates respond to COVID-19 and the circumstances our neighbors confront in the coming days and months. The National League of Cities REAL Council wants to highlight examples of local action leaders can

Continue reading

What Does the Digital Equity Act Mean for Cities?

Closing the digital divide in America is more than just an infrastructure challenge—it’s an economic one, too. Across the country, too many homes and businesses still don’t have access to adequate broadband infrastructure, and in many communities the infrastructure in place is not enough to ensure that all residents get to participate in the local economy.

Continue reading

America’s Fastest Growing Cities Are Becoming More Diverse, But Face Rising Inequity

Ninety-eight percent of growth in the hundred largest cities since 2000 was from growth in minority populations. A Brookings Institution analysis of the 2011- 2015 American Community Survey found that despite this increased diversity in cities, racial segregation has only moderately declined. Dominantly white neighborhoods in cities were 79 percent white in 2000 and 72

Continue reading

Rochester Commits to Racial Equity

On January 22, 2019, Mayor Lovely Warren gathered with the National League of Cities Race, Equity And Leadership (REAL) Director Leon Andrews, former mayor of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Betsy Hodges, and the Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce to commit the City of Rochester’s time and resources to a new racial equity initiative. Mayor Warren issued a

Continue reading

One Small City’s Big Steps to Undo Systemic Racism

The Village of Park Forest, Illinois was established in 1948 to house military veterans as the nation’s first planned community after World War II. Park Forest was initially designed as one of the few communities without restrictive covenants by religion. Building on that ten-year tradition, Park Forest was racially desegregated in 1959 when the first African-American

Continue reading

REAL Announces New Partnership with MBK Alliance

Last week, My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) Alliance at the Obama Foundation launched the MBK Network, a new learning community and support system for MBK leaders that will provide support, resources, and opportunities to build on local success and create lasting change. This week, the National League of Cities (NLC) is excited to announce our partnership

Continue reading