Tag: digital divide

How San Jose is Closing the Digital Divide

This is the fifth in a series of case studies tracking how cities are handling small cell wireless infrastructure deployment on their streets. To learn more about this technology and how your city can get ready for it, read NLC’s municipal action guide on small cell wireless infrastructure. Equity drives San Jose’s approach to bringing

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Closing the Digital Divide in America

This is a guest post by David L. Cohen, Executive Vice President of Comcast Corporation. Chance the Rapper (left) and Comcast Executive Vice President David L. Cohen present laptops to students from Chicago’s Alcott College Prep at a recent event to announce new Internet Essentials milestones. (Comcast) According to the U.S. Census Bureau, only 52

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Building Effective Partnerships: Strategies to Increase Digital Access and Literacy, Part 2

This i s a guest post by Delano Squires, and the second in a series on how cities can improve digital literacy in their communities. Read the first blog here. Mayor Vincent C. Gray has taken a number of steps to make the District of Columbia an attractive location for tech companies. In November 2012,

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Connecting Your City: Strategies to Increase Digital Access and Literacy, Part 1

This is a guest post by Sheila Dugan, and the first in a series on how cities can improve digital literacy in their communities. Cities across the United States are innovating. From Boston to San Francisco, they are leveraging technology to improve the delivery of social services, increase transparency, and better communicate with their constituents.

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Don’t Discount the Value of a Library in a Digital World

Great cities have great central libraries. Some are architecturally significant such as in Seattle or Copenhagen. Others are signature buildings that embody the civic spirit and unique character of a community, such as in Fort Smith, Arkansas where the citizens voted to tax themselves in order to build a main library building and neighborhood branches.

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