Tag: Columbus

Can Columbus, Ohio Become a Model for Equitable Community Development?

In many ways, the city of Columbus, Ohio, is an outlier among its peers. It’s the most populous city in Ohio (with 886,000 residents) — despite Cleveland and Cincinnati being perhaps better known — and its metropolitan area, with 2.1 million, leads the Buckeye State as well. And unlike many other cities in America’s so-called

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Cities Can Tackle Hunger and Food Waste Through Collaboration

This is a guest post by NLC Board Member Priscilla Tyson, council president pro tempore, Columbus, Ohio. In this day and age, everyone should have access to healthy food. Unfortunately, that’s not the case in Columbus and Franklin County, Ohio. Nearly one-in-five children in my city of Columbus, Ohio, is food insecure. This mirrors statistics

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Local Elected Officials Honored for Let’s Move! Cities, Towns and Counties Achievements

Everyone has a role to play in preventing childhood obesity, including local elected officials who serve as leaders in adopting policies or making environmental changes so children in their communities reach their full potential and live healthy lives. As a part of Let’s Move! Cities, Towns and Counties (LMCTC), communities can earn bronze, silver and

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State of the Cities 2013: Strategically Balancing the Books

This is the sixth post in a seven-part series on trends and themes in local leadership. The National League of Cities’ 2012 City Fiscal Conditions report  projected a sixth year in a row of declining revenues for cities, and a 25 percent decline in ending balances (reserves) over the last four years. It’s clear that

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State of the Cities 2013: Investing in Education Today for a Better Tomorrow

This is the fourth post in a seven-part series on trends and themes in local leadership. In his 14th State of the City Address delivered at a local high school on Columbus, Ohio’s south side, Mayor Michael B. Coleman stood before fellow city leaders, school district officials, nonprofit and business leaders and residents, passionately calling

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