Tag: cities fiscal economy economic recovery

Building Affordable Housing is Risky Business

Please note: This post is a collaboration between James Brooks and Michael Wallace at NLC.  For the past two days, The Washington Post has lambasted the Department of Housing and Urban Development and local housing authorities and community development corporations for failing to adequately manage programs that build or rehabilitate affordable housing. There is a

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Budget Compromise is Only the Beginning

This week we’ve been receiving a lot of phone calls on the budget compromise and where cities came out. NLC, in coordination with cities and towns across the nation, fought hard to preserve priority investments in cities. The issues NLC identified as priorities – like Community Development Block Grants – help our cities get back

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State of the Cities in 2011: What Are Mayors Saying About Economic Development?

This is the fourth in a seven-part series about mayors’ 2011 State of the City speeches. In various “State of the City” addresses, local leaders stressed that the best way to improve their city’s economic position is to increase investment within the city, which they admit is no easy task.  Whether it’s through promoting second

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State of the Cities in 2011: Building a More Efficient Government

This is the second in a seven-part series about mayors’ 2011 State of the City speeches. In a nation where fiscal responsibility is in the spotlight, and groups are grappling for funding, the “State of the City” addresses we read clearly show that city governments are in search of ways to balance their budgets. Unfortunately,

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Vacant Properties Compound the Forclosure Disaster

You don’t have to be a policy researcher to know intuitively that mortgage foreclosures and vacant and abandoned properties are a serious threat to the well-being of a neighborhood.  An increase in foreclosed properties in any neighborhood, especially a high concentration of properties in one neighborhood, creates an oversupply of housing stock (including low value

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Cities return to “old normal”

I’ve been hearing a lot of chatter about “the new normal” – the prospect of the current economic malaise resulting in a longer-term pattern of stagnating economic growth. We’ve even thrown the term around a few times here at NLC. But, predictions about slow growth in the coming years are not new. The new piece

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