Tag: census

Five Ways to Prepare Your City for Next Year’s Census

The Census Bureau has spent the past nine years preparing for the country’s largest domestic mobilization effort: the count of every individual in America based on where they reside on and around April 1, 2020. This upcoming Monday marks one year out from the long-awaited “Census Day.” Now is the time for cities to lay

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Supreme Court to Review Census Citizenship Question

In April the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case that will determine whether a citizenship question will appear in the 2020 census. A decision in Department of Commerce v. New York is expected by the end of June, in time presumably to include or exclude the question from the print version of the

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What the Shutdown Means for the Census

Unlike many other federal agencies, the U.S. Census Bureau has an unusual budget that waxes and wanes in 10-year intervals as it prepares for America’s largest domestic mobilization effort — the decennial census. While the Bureau typically survives government shutdowns with minimal long-term impacts, this particular shutdown comes right as the Bureau begins its final

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Top 5 NLC Reports from 2018

What did city leaders want to learn about most this year? The numbers don’t lie: autonomous vehicles, recycling, small cell deployment, the census and local trends. At the National League of Cities, we are dedicated to ensuring that cities are able to thrive and stay abreast of emerging issues in an ever-changing national landscape. And

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Why the Census is Headed To SCOTUS

For more on how to prepare your city for the 2020 census visit NLC.org/census. In March 2018 Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross issued a memorandum stating a citizenship question would be added to the 2020 census questionnaire. In In Re Department of Commerce the Supreme Court will not be deciding whether this question may be

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Preparing for the 2020 Census

Today, the National League of Cities (NLC) released Preparing for the 2020 Census, a new municipal action guide that will help cities navigate the upcoming census. Visit NLC.org/census to find the full guide. Even before the U.S. Constitution outlines the powers of the three branches of the government, it mandates a decennial count of all

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NLC Reengagement Network Releases New Tools for Cities

With the release of two new tools for cities this week, the National League of Cities Reengagement Network is adding to the universe of resources for implementing or adopting comprehensive strategies to reconnect opportunity youth to jobs, education and civic life. The annual Reengagement Census, updated with information from 20 sites for the 2016-17 school

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Why the 2020 Census Could Be a Problem for Cities

This is a guest post by Mayor Mark Stodola, Little Rock, Arkansas, president of the National League of Cities. This Tuesday, the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Oversight and Government Reform heard testimony from the U.S. Census Bureau’s interim director. He provided an overview of how preparations for the 2020 decennial census are going

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California Sues Trump Administration Over Census Citizenship Question

This week, on the same day that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced his plan to add a question about citizenship to the 2020 census, California filed a complaint seeking an injunction preventing the question from being added. The next day, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced he would lead a multi-state lawsuit challenging the

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What a Citizenship Question on the Census Would Mean for Cities

There is no question that America’s city leaders share Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross’s commitment to a full and fair 2020 Census. Census data is vital to cities for uses including regional planning, economic research, public health initiatives, and allocating more than $600 billion in federal funding to state and local governments. But because city leaders understand

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