Tag: California Cities Gang Prevention Network

Violence Prevention Efforts in California Cities Continue Strong Despite Challenges

Ten California cities — nine longtime participants in a statewide gang prevention network, plus newly added Long Beach — gathered a few weeks ago to share practices and develop a 2013 policy agenda.  Despite prevailing challenges such as resumed high rates of violent crime, significant turnover among mayors, chiefs of police, city councils, and diminished police forces, and fewer resources than

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The Soft Stuff is the Hard Stuff

“I’d rather be wanted for murder than not wanted at all,” a juvenile murderer said to me when I served as Commissioner of Youth Services in Massachusetts.  This frightening statement throws into sharp relief the fundamental need shared by all of us, namely that we must be seen as important in someone’s eyes, claimed, “beloved.”

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Governor Brown Signs AB 526, Paving the Way for Better Coordination of Violence Prevention Funding in California

This week brings some good news from the violence prevention front in California. Frequent readers of this blog and other National League of Cities media may be aware that NLC’s Institute for Youth, Education and Families has co-sponsored a 13-city gang prevention initiative since 2007.  The California Cities Gang Prevention Network identifies promising strategies to

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One Stroke of a Pen Could Mean Less Violence, More Vibrant Communities for California

Jack Calhoun, director of the California Cities Gang Prevention Network and senior consultant to NLC’s Institute for Youth, Education and Families and the U.S. Department of Justice, wrote the following post on youth violence prevention legislation in California, which is cross-posted at Mr. Calhoun’s Hope Matters website at http://www.hopematters.org. Assembly Bill (AB) 526 sits on

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Kids Living in Combat Zones…in U.S. Cities

Which group do you think has higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): American soldiers deployed to combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, or American children living in high-crime urban neighborhoods who are exposed to community violence?  At a Congressional briefing held a week ago, Dr. Howard Spivak, Director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control

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