Tag: Amazon

What City Leaders Should Know about South Dakota v. Wayfair

On Thursday, in a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court handed down a major victory in South Dakota v. Wayfair, concluding that state and local governments can require remote retailers with no physical presence in the state to collect and remit sales taxes. After years of congressional inaction, the decision brings cities one significant step closer

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States and Local Governments Win Landmark Online Sales Tax Case

On Thursday, in South Dakota v. Wayfair, the Supreme Court ruled that states and local governments can require vendors with no physical presence in the state to collect sales tax. According to the court, which ruled in a 5-4 decision, “economic and virtual contacts” are enough to create a “substantial nexus” with the state allowing

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Why Equity Matters for Amazon’s HQ2 Search

This is a special CitiesSpeak feature by Carlos Delgado, senior associate for the Rose Center for Public Leadership, and Aliza R. Wasserman, senior associate with NLC’s Race, Equity, And Leadership (REAL) Initiative.  Since the announcement of the HQ2 shortlist, countless organizations and media outlets have examined both the stated criteria for Amazon’s decision and the outside

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What Data Tells Us About Amazon’s HQ2 Decision

This is a guest post from Richard Leadbeater, State Government Industry Manager at Esri. Last Thursday, I lost five dollars. I had bet that Detroit would be the winner in the Amazon HQ2 bid. I thought the city met all the basic criteria: Delta Airlines hub, space to grow, economic incentives, lower cost of living,

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What Amazon’s HQ2 Shortlist Tells Us About Modern Cities

The race to land Amazon’s second headquarters, or HQ2, has become one of the largest economic development opportunities in a generation — a truly transformative opportunity for the chosen city that ultimately wins the competition. And a competition it has become, with creative and inventive ideas pitched from mayors and economic development officials throughout the

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Supreme Court to Rule on Internet Sales Tax Collection

In a move that could bring sweeping changes to the online commerce sector, the Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether states may require out-of-state retailers to collect sales tax. In Quill Corp. v. North Dakota (1992), the Supreme Court held that states cannot require retailers with no in-state physical presence to collect sales tax. South Dakota

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Our Eight Most Popular Articles of 2017

In January 2017, America’s cities faced a precarious moment. After several years of runaway growth in downtowns and neighborhoods, major cities were at their most wealthy, safe, and vibrant point in decades. Meanwhile, mid-sized cities and small towns continued to struggle with growing challenges — and a divisive 2016 campaign season had laid those inequalities

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How Will Amazon Choose its Second Headquarters?

Last week, Amazon accepted final bids in the host city competition for its second headquarters. Over 200 cities applied across North America, with pitches that ranged from exhaustive to persuasive to seemingly stunt-based. With the bidding period closed, the ball is now in Amazon’s court. But how will the tech giant choose a winner? For

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Why a Regional Bid May Land HQ2

Proposals to capture one of the most coveted economic development deals in history — Amazon’s second headquarters, or HQ2 — are due. While some cities (here and here) have not been swayed to join the hunt, there are no doubt hundreds of submissions, and nearly the same amount of speculation about which one of these

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Technology Wars Yield Efficiencies for Cities

Pick up nearly any magazine devoted to business, finance, technology or consumers and you will learn the details of the war being waged by corporate kingpins Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook. Ostensibly this competition is supposed to be good for the average consumer whether individual or corporate. This assumes of course that the average consumer

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