Ensuring Food for Everyone in Boston

A city of nearly 700,000 people (about 11 percent of whom are 65 or older), Boston, Massachusetts, joined the AARP Network of Age-Friendly States and Communities in 2014. Its age-friendly effort is led by two groups, and The city’s Age Strong Commission, through it’s Age-Friendly Boston leads Boston’s age-friendly effort.   The Challenge  “The most pressing concern for Boston has

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How Cities Can Support a Safer Return to Vital Instructional Aquatics

The COVID-19 pandemic has created unimaginable challenges for public health professionals and policymakers in states and municipalities across the country. Their continued efforts and sacrifices are commendable as they navigate difficult decisions regarding if and when various businesses can reopen to the public. The aquatics community is respectfully imploring decision makers to prioritize opening publicly-owned

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The Impact of the Looming Eviction Cliff on School-age Youth

With the school year beginning in cities, towns and villages across the country, the recent eviction moratorium order from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers a cautious moment of relief for vulnerable households at risk of eviction. Roughly 14.3 million renter households contain children under the age of 18, and the looming eviction

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Federal Aid for Local Government Operations is Necessary to Safeguard Health, Security, and Mobility

Senate Majority Emergency Aid Proposal Was Out of Step with Economists, Local Leaders, and Public Opinion On Thursday, the Senate defeated Majority Leader McConnell’s (R-KY) proposed $500 billion emergency aid package. Regrettably, NLC could not support the emergency aid proposal because it fell far short of providing the resources that states and localities need to stabilize budgets, manage cases of COVID-19, and restore economic activity. By failing to provide any indication of what the Senate Leader would consider an acceptable

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Congress Returns for Fall Legislative Sprint

Congress is back in Washington for a critical fall legislative session. Congress left in August without finishing a COVID-19 relief package, and both federal government funding and expiring transportation programs need to be handled before September 30. After months contending with extreme economic woes and a devastating health crisis, America’s cities, towns and villages are

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SCOTUS Leaving Stay-At-Home Orders Alone

Since April 2020, the Supreme Court has handled numerous emergency requests related to COVID-19. Requests involving stay-at-home orders and judge-made changes to elections laws are of most interest to states and local governments. The trends in both categories of cases is clear but the reasons are murky. Oftentimes none of the Justices announce, much less

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Building a Just and Fair Anti-Eviction Strategy

The pandemic has forced millions of Americans into sudden financial hardship: 57.4 million unemployment claims have been filed across the country since March 21st. A combination of direct stimulus dollars, federal, state, and local eviction moratoria have staved off mass evictions since March and has helped vulnerable renters maintain stable housing. Given the expiration of

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A Beginner’s Guide to Intersectionality

Across outcomes in education, health, housing and nearly every other aspect of daily life in the United States, race is the single-most predictive indicator of one’s success. Racism is pervasive in government, non-profit and private systems and the policies, practices and procedures that create and uphold those systems and institutions, as we outlined in our previous blog “What does it mean to

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