Consequences of Underfunding Transportation

What was billed as the release of a new report exploring the expected consequences of a 35 percent cut in federal funding of transportation programs quickly turned from a Washington, D.C. wonk-fest into far more interesting speculation about how Congress will expand revenue streams for the Highway Trust Fund. The setting was the joint release

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The Latest in Economic Development

This week’s blog discusses a different kind of university business park, manufacturing in Silicon Valley, the future of economic growth, a new report from Deloitte on fixing joblessness, and a closer look at the last jobs report. Comment below or send to common@nlc.org. Get the last edition of “The Latest in Economic Development” here. How

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Cities and Universities: Natural Partners in Advancing Sustainability

As city budgets and resources continue to feel the weight of economic pressures, one word has been at the center of recommendations to overcome challenges: partnerships. And when considering the range of topics contained within city sustainability efforts, the types of available partnership opportunities can become extensive: private sector, community groups, advocacy organizations, state agencies,

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One Stroke of a Pen Could Mean Less Violence, More Vibrant Communities for California

Jack Calhoun, director of the California Cities Gang Prevention Network and senior consultant to NLC’s Institute for Youth, Education and Families and the U.S. Department of Justice, wrote the following post on youth violence prevention legislation in California, which is cross-posted at Mr. Calhoun’s Hope Matters website at www.hopematters.org. Assembly Bill (AB) 526 sits on

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The Latest in Economic Development

This week’s blog discusses the many reasons for America’s persistent unemployment problem, explores New York City’s ambitious bet on an “innovation economy,” looks at an emerging market for microlenders, and highlights the changing environment for America’s malls. Comment below or send to common@nlc.org. Get the last edition of “The Latest in Economic Development” here. In

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Running the Relay: Thoughts on Mayor Castro’s Keynote

San Antonio Mayor and NLC Board Member Julián Castro entered the national spotlight with his highly anticipated keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday night.  While pundits assess the tone and framing of his speech, I find myself reflecting on how its core message of expanding opportunity for all residents is being fulfilled

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Untangling the Skills Mismatch Debate: Implications for Local Economic Development

The skills mismatch debate underscores why a solitary focus on college completion is insufficient to build competitive regional economies. The paradox of persistent unemployment and unfilled jobs has many analysts pointing to a  skills mismatch in the economy.  This widely accepted hypothesis has come under fire recently, with implications for local and regional economic development.

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The Latest in Economic Development

This week’s blog highlights the recent success of New Jersey’s economic development incentives, explores the story of two rural North Carolina towns and how they dealt with losses of industry, mentions efforts in Seattle and Philadelphia to streamline their regulatory structures, and points out increasing foreign direct investment flows from China to the US. Comment

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Our Divided Political Heart

It’s a shame that political party conventions don’t provide the kind of compelling and stimulating debate on policy issues that might actually serve to inform voters – assuming any are listening – about the electoral choice before the nation. It’s all the more regrettable because the American Republic is a nation of problem solvers all

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Resources for Rural Communities–in Good Times and Bad

As the worst drought in U.S. history continues to impact agriculture and businesses in rural communities, various federal agencies are offering additional aid to affected Americans.  With more than 1,800 counties designated as disaster areas, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA), Commerce, Interior and Transportation have worked to lessen hardships by providing emergency loan funds

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