Category: Transportation

Smile for the (Red Light) Camera!

This is a guest post by Elizabeth Madison. Do you think red light enforcement cameras reduce traffic accidents? Or do they exist simply to provide revenue? In either case, their successful implementation depends on the ability of local law enforcement to accurately and reliably measure changes in traffic accidents that occur where the cameras are

Continue reading

Must All Signs Be Treated the Same?

Update: the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for this case on Monday, January 12, 2015. Municipal codes treat signs differently, meaning that spray-painted signs like this might not be allowed to remain in your neighbor’s yard for longer than necessary. (Getty Images) The Supreme Court’s decision in the case of Reed v. Town of Gilbert,

Continue reading

Time to Re-write Outdated Traffic Ordinances?

In Heien v. North Carolina, a police officer pulled over a car because he thought North Carolina law required that motor vehicles have two working brake lights.  It turns out the officer was wrong.  The North Carolina Court of Appeals concluded that state law requires motor vehicles to only have one working brake light. So

Continue reading

Ride Sharing: The Big Opportunity for Cities

Uber, Lyft and Sidecar present cities with the opportunity to radically transform transportation in their communities. If cities make use of the lessons they are learning from work with car share firms like Zip Car and with bike share programs, they are likely to achieve remarkable success in the newest iteration of the sharing economy.

Continue reading

WUF7: The Mayors Forum Part II — Individual City Solutions

This is the fifth post in a series of blogs on the World Urban Forum 7 in Medellin, Colombia. In my previous blog, I wrote that the focus of the Mayors Forum was on inclusiveness in order to create a “city of opportunity.” However, I would be misleading you if I implied that each mayor was striving to create

Continue reading

AFF Transportation Bonds Support Infrastructure, Jobs

According to estimates from the Federal Highway Administration, local governments invested $53 billion in highway programs raised from local revenue sources, yet that amount does not come close to meeting the needs for investment in roads, transit, bridges, waterways and airports. While Congress debates the renewal of a national surface transportation program and how to

Continue reading

Investment in Nation’s Infrastructure is Economic Lifeline

President Obama used the backdrop of the historic Union Depot Station in Saint Paul, Minn. to announce another round of federal TIGER grants – the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery – competitive grant program that has provided 270 communities with an opportunity to make strategic multimodal transportation investments since its inception five years ago. The

Continue reading

NLC Joins “Rails-to-Trails” Supreme Court Brief

Lisa Soronen is the Executive Director of the State and Local Legal Center and a regular contributor to CitiesSpeak. Perhaps your city is fortunate and has extensive biking and recreational trails.  If so, have you ever wondered, where do bike paths come from? Many bike paths in the country come from abandoned railroad land grants or

Continue reading

Cities lead, but cannot go it alone

An extended conversation with NLC President Chris Coleman. Listen to an abbreviated podcast of this interview on NLC’s Sound Cloud account. As the end of the year approaches, top 100 lists, year-in-reviews and “person of the year” recognitions are beginning to make their rounds. What are the year’s biggest themes in politics, culture and entertainment? How

Continue reading

Fresno Leverages TIGER Grants for Complete Streets Planning

This is the second in a series of blogs that will explore the impact TIGER grants have on local communities by helping them better leverage financing options, meet transportation safety goals, and increase overall quality of life by introducing alternative modes of transportation.  Click here for the first blog, which explores Seattle’s Mercer Corridor Project.

Continue reading