Category: Technology

What Really Makes Cities Smart: Understanding the Citizen Experience

This is a guest post by Heidi Lorenzen, vice president of marketing for Accela. Cities are laboratories for democracy where residents can directly access their local elected leaders to make their concerns known. While federal regulation and legislation moves at a seemingly glacial pace, cities have to act nimbly and continuously evolve to maintain a

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How San Jose is Closing the Digital Divide

This is the fifth in a series of case studies tracking how cities are handling small cell wireless infrastructure deployment on their streets. To learn more about this technology and how your city can get ready for it, read NLC’s municipal action guide on small cell wireless infrastructure. Equity drives San Jose’s approach to bringing

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How Dayton Sets an Example on Transparency

This is a guest post by Dayton, Ohio, Mayor Nan Whaley. Dayton’s data transparency initiative, Dayton Open Data, is transforming the city government from the inside out. Transparency tools are powerful for our democracy, bringing vital information about local government to homes, libraries and community meetings. With a computer or smart phone, our residents can

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Tempe Brings Transparency to Small Cell Installation

This is the fourth in a series of case studies tracking how cities are handling small cell wireless infrastructure deployment on their streets. To learn more about this technology and how your city can get ready for it, read NLC’s municipal action guide on small cell wireless infrastructure. The city of Tempe knows that small

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For Wireless Broadband, Raleigh Finds Common Ground Through Partnerships

This is the third in a series of case studies tracking how cities are handling small cell wireless infrastructure deployment on their streets. To learn more about this technology and how your city can get ready for it, read NLC’s municipal action guide on small cell wireless infrastructure. The city of Raleigh is focused on

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How are Cities Shaping an Autonomous Future?

This is an excerpt from our newest municipal action guide, Autonomous Vehicle Pilots Across America. The unstoppable forces of automation and artificial intelligence are rapidly changing the way we move through, work in and design cities. Technological advancements are transforming the mobility environment as a wide range of companies continue investing billions of dollars to develop, test and

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Lincoln Makes Small Cell Work for Residents

This is the second in a series of case studies tracking how cities are handling small cell wireless infrastructure deployment on their streets. To learn more about this technology and how your city can get ready for it, read NLC’s municipal action guide on small cell wireless infrastructure. In the city of Lincoln, Nebraska, broadband

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Balancing Policy and Technology in Kansas City

There is nothing new in the world. In ancient times, when the invading hoard is approaching the city, the wise leader sends an emissary through the front gate to parley. In today’s economy, these same tactics can be employed by cities seeking to quickly gain an understanding of what a startup is proposing, how that proposal

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4 Unexpected Ways Congress’ Aviation Bill Impacts Cities

Every day, more than 42,000 flights travel through cities in the United States, carrying 2.5 million airline passengers across more than 29 million square miles of airspace. This is why reauthorizing the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was on the must-do list before Congress leaves Washington for the mid-term elections. Cities were glad to see that

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Five Takeaways for Cities from the FCC’s Small Cell Preemption Order

On Wednesday, September 26, the Federal Communications Commission voted to approve a declaratory ruling and report and order that would enact harsh new preemptions of local authority over small cell wireless facility deployment and management of local rights-of-way. The order will go into effect 90 days after publication of the final version in the Federal

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