Category: taxation

Supreme Court Hears Internet Sales Tax Arguments in South Dakota v. Wayfair

In South Dakota v. Wayfair South Dakota is asking the Supreme Court to overrule precedent and hold that states and local governments may require retailers with no in-state physical presence to collect sales tax. The National Conference of State Legislatures estimated that states lost $23.3 billion in 2012 from being prohibited from collecting sales tax

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Leveraging Your City’s Employee Benefits Package

This is an NLC staff post by Anita Yadavalli. On March 11-14, city leaders from across the nation gathered at the Congressional City Conference in Washington, D.C., to speak up for city priorities and rebuild America’s infrastructure. I was quite busy during that time, flocking from meeting to meeting, greeting seasoned city leaders and welcoming

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5 Things City Leaders Should Know About Opportunity Zones

This is a guest post by Steve Glickman and John Lettieri, co-founders of the Economic Innovation Group. Opportunity Zones is a new community development initiative established by Congress in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 designed to spur long-term private investment in low-income communities nationwide. The program offers a federal tax incentive for reinvesting

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What the ‘Tax Cuts and Jobs Act’ Will Mean for Cities

After a last-minute procedural delay forced the House of Representatives into a re-vote, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (H.R. 1) this morning passed both houses of Congress. The bill  will now head to President Trump, who is expected to sign it into law. The Senate had to make several last minute changes to the

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Tax Reform Continues to Race Forward

A lot has happened in the past month on tax reform. On November 16, the House passed its version of a tax bill, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (H.R.1), just under a week after the Senate released its own version of the bill. After a tenuous 20 hours of debate and deal-making, the Senate

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How to Measure Pension Fiscal Health in Your City

The state of retirement funding has become an obvious fiscal concern for city governments, especially since the Great Recession. In fact, a recent National League of Cities survey revealed the cost of employee/retiree pensions ranks third (following infrastructure needs and public safety needs) among the most negative factors impacting city budgets. Perhaps more telling is

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Six Things City Leaders Should Know About the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act

Yesterday, the House Ways and Means Committee released its long-awaited “Tax Cuts & Jobs Act” plan. The proposed tax reform plan aims to streamline the U.S. tax code and create some tax relief for middle and low income Americans by reducing the number of tax brackets, reducing marginal tax rates, and expanding family tax credits.

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Senate Plan Threatens State and Local Tax Deduction

Thursday evening, the Senate passed the FY2018 Budget reconciliation spending blueprint, paving the way for a potential $1.5 trillion tax cut. In a misguided effort to provide a pay for an ambition tax reform plan yet to be seen, Senator Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.) proposed an amendment that opens the door to a cap or

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South Dakota Asks Supreme Court to Consider Online Sales Tax

For years, local authorities have tangled with online retailers over sales tax collection within communities. But this fall, a new development in a blockbuster Supreme Court case could force the issue into the national spotlight. In Quill Corp. v. North Dakota (1992), the Supreme Court held that states cannot require retailers with no in-state physical presence to

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Five Things City Leaders Should Know About Tax Reform

This week, the “Big 6” tax negotiators comprised of leadership from the House, Senate and Administration, released its highly anticipated tax framework. The plan was a slightly updated version of the outline we saw in April. While the new document does provide some answers for cities, many unknowns still remain. Little has changed since the

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