Category: Rose Center

In Detroit, Neighborhood Redevelopment Starts With “Trusting Your Gut”

Last Monday, the City of Detroit emerged from Chapter 9 Bankruptcy — nearly five years after it filed for the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. The June 2013 filing came at what was perhaps the nadir of the city’s spirits, battered by decades of population and jobs losses. A few months after the filing, the

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An Inside Look at Equitable Economic Development in Phoenix

This post is part of a series on NLC’s Equitable Economic Development (EED) Fellowship. This week, I had the opportunity to interview Albert Santana, Director of High Capacity Transit and one of the Equitable Economic Development (EED) Fellows from the city of Phoenix, Arizona. Carlos Delgado: Albert, thank you so much for taking the time to share

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An Inside Look at Equitable Economic Development in Austin

This post is part of a series on NLC’s Equitable Economic Development (EED) Fellowship. This week, I had the opportunity to interview Councilmember Delia Garza — an NLC Equitable Economic Development (EED) Fellow from Austin, Texas. Councilmember Garza is the first elected official to be part of a EED Fellowship team. Carlos Delgado: Councilmember Garza, thank you

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Can Columbus, Ohio Become a Model for Equitable Community Development?

In many ways, the city of Columbus, Ohio, is an outlier among its peers. It’s the most populous city in Ohio (with 886,000 residents) — despite Cleveland and Cincinnati being perhaps better known — and its metropolitan area, with 2.1 million, leads the Buckeye State as well. And unlike many other cities in America’s so-called

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How Booming Salt Lake City Can Keep Housing Affordable

The city of Salt Lake City, Utah, is booming. Between 2010 and 2014, Salt Lake City gained 4,400 new residents, doubling its pace of growth over the previous decade. Now the city’s population is rapidly approaching 200,000, in a metro area pushing 1.2 million people. Planners anticipate this growth continuing, with another 30,000 city residents

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In West Louisville, Kentucky, Investing in Equity and Inclusion

This post is part of a series on NLC’s Equitable Economic Development (EED) Fellowship. Theresa Zawacki is the Senior Policy Advisor of Louisville Forward and member of the Equitable Economic Development (EED) Fellowship team. Louisville Forward is an integrated approach to economic and community development. The agency combines business attraction, expansion and retention activities and talent and

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In Kisela v. Hughes, Confronting Police Who “Shoot First and Think Later”

In the annals of the Supreme Court, summary reversals overturning a lower court decision without briefing or oral argument are common. But rare are summary reversals that receive media attention — because such action is “usually reserved … for situations in which the law is settled and stable, the facts are not in dispute, and the

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Can Reconciling Slavery’s Legacy Shape Richmond’s Future?

Among city leaders and economic development professionals, it has become conventional wisdom that history can be a neighborhood’s greatest asset. Historic buildings, businesses, streets and public spaces offer the opportunity to tell the stories of a place’s unique identity — and done right, it can provide fuel for authentic revitalization, compete for private capital, public

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Exploring Housing, Equity, and Historic Heritage Across America

For city leaders, attracting new investment to neglected neighborhoods is a fraught challenge. Every decision must juggle housing affordability, economic opportunity and mobility for existing residents, and preserving an area’s unique cultural and historic heritage. In this year’s Rose Center for Public Leadership land use fellowship, those questions are taking center stage. Now in its

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What American Cities Can Learn From Toronto’s Success

Last month, representatives from four NLC member cities — Columbus, Ohio, Richmond, Virginia, Salt Lake City, and Tucson, Arizona — traveled to Toronto, Ontario for a study tour. With a population of 2,800,000, Toronto is North America’s fourth-largest city — and the  community is working to cope with explosive growth (fueled in part by immigration),

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