Category: Reducing Use of Jails

How Local Leaders Can Help Our Most Vulnerable Young People

City governments and city leaders continuously grapple with the costs of the “deep end” of the juvenile justice system. Deep-end youth include the roughly 30,000 young people placed in detention facilities who may be better served in targeted community-based services in the city. Deep-end youth constitute our most vulnerable and marginalized young people. Many deep-end

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What Triage Centers Mean for Cities, First-Responders and People in Crisis

Triage centers provide a strong opportunity to bring first responders and community-based service providers together to effectively address behavioral health crises and improve quality of life across a city. City leaders across the country are prioritizing better police responses to people suffering behavioral health crises, which include mental health or substance abuse crises.  Triage centers

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How Small Cities Can Address Addiction

Too often people suffering with addiction end up entangled in the criminal justice system, as substance misuse and addiction continue to increase across the nation as cities grapple with how to tackle the epidemic. Small cities can face the daunting challenge of addressing similar rates of addiction with less resources than larger cities. In November at

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City Leaders Should Consider Pre-Arrest Diversion

Several cities across the nation are embracing pre-arrest diversion to reduce mass incarceration. Pre-arrest diversion allows officers to divert a person into community services to receive treatment rather than arresting and jailing that person. Cities play an integral role in who enters local jails and are implementing programs and policies, such as pre-arrest diversion, that

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MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge Awards Funding to 12 Cities and Counties

Last week the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge announced $22 million in new funding to support 12 new cities and counties working to reduce incarceration and 13 sites already part of the growing national movement. The National League of Cities (NLC) is proud to be part of the movement

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Mayors Urge Greater Support, Clearer Path for Cities to Combat the Opioid Crisis

On October 10, the National League of Cities (NLC) hosted Gary, Indiana Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson, NLC’s first vice president, Huntington, West Virginia Mayor Steve Williams and Knoxville, Tennessee Mayor Madeline Rogero in Washington to highlight the partnership needed from our federal government to successfully combat the opioid crisis in cities across America. Starting with a

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Cities Can Amplify Formerly Incarcerated Voices to Drive Justice Reform

This is a guest post form Ronald Simpson-Bey, who serves as the Director of Outreach and Alumni Engagement at JustLeadershipUSA. For any criminal justice reform policy to be truly effective, and for it to deliver the results that are long overdue — the decarceration and decriminalization of black and brown communities and communities experiencing poverty

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Three Ways to Build a Best Practices Toolkit

Whether you’re a newly elected official or an experienced hand, learning from fellow city leaders and building a best a practices toolkit is part of the job. And at the National Black Caucus of Local Elected Officials (NBC-LEO) 2018 Summer Conference, best practices are the name of the game. Hosted in Hollywood, Florida, this July

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‘Madison Speaks’ Brings Police, Community Together

In March, several officers of the Madison, Wisconsin, Police Department (MPD) brought together a diverse group of community members to hear their ideas on increasing trust between law enforcement and the community. Captain John Patterson, currently assigned to Madison’s South Police District, adapted this event from the Orlando, Florida, “Orlando Speaks” initiative, which he learned

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In Kisela v. Hughes, Confronting Police Who “Shoot First and Think Later”

In the annals of the Supreme Court, summary reversals overturning a lower court decision without briefing or oral argument are common. But rare are summary reversals that receive media attention — because such action is “usually reserved … for situations in which the law is settled and stable, the facts are not in dispute, and the

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