Category: Public Safety

National City Responds As a Community to COVID-19

As the country faces a spike in infections, many cities are rethinking their reopening strategies to ensure their residents remain safe while moving towards normalcy. In National City, CA, the second oldest city in San Diego County, Mayor Alejandra Sotelo-Solis is urging her residents to stay the course. As the California governor revisits openings of

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On The Use of Force by Municipal Law Enforcement Officers

On Thursday, June 18, the National League of Cities (NLC) took emergency action and its board of directors unanimously passed a Resolution on the Use of Force by Municipal Law Enforcement Officers.   Local elected leaders have the primary responsibility for ensuring the health and safety of their residents. And right now, for the sake of all of America’s residents, cities, towns and villages across the

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How Portland Got PPE to Its Most Vulnerable

Over 650,000 people reside in the city of  Portland, Oregon which makes up the vast majority of the 900,00 people who reside in Multnomah County,  home to about 800,000 people.   In 2012, Portland was among a handful of US cities to participate in a global  predecessor to the U.S.-based  AARP Network of Age-Friendly States and Communities.

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Keeping City Workers Safe in the Wake of COVID-19

Protecting health care providers, first responders and other essential employees from the COVID-19 virus is vital to slowing the spread of the pandemic. The CDC has advised that everyone should be wearing cloth masks in public. Accordingly, all front-line staff that interact with the public need some level of personal protective equipment (PPE). However, cities,

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Retooling Criminal Justice Responses for Equity and Continued Public Safety

Cities have already begun to alter arrest and detention practices in order to support social or physical distancing and related measures in response to COVID-19. In many cases, these alterations continue efforts underway to retool local public safety efforts to rely less on high and disproportionate arrest and incarceration rates. Sustained momentum with such practices will reduce risks for several groups:   The nation’s three million first responders;   Persons experiencing mental health crises, substance use disorder issues, and homelessness, who might otherwise go to jail;  

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Cities Lobby Congress on Substance Use, Mental Health and Homelessness

Every day cities, towns, and villages across the country face challenges posed by mental illness, substance use disorder and homelessness. An effective response by municipal leaders requires a comprehensive, multi-sector approach. On Wednesday, October 30, the National League of Cities held a briefing on Capitol Hill so that local leaders could tell Congress what they need,

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Ten Ways to Protect Your City from Cyberattacks

Every hour, 26% of local governments report a cyberattack. But according to a new NLC analysis, done in partnership with the Public Technology Institute, nearly a quarter don’t have a cybersecurity plan that is designed to protect government information systems from attack/provide steps for recovery in case of attack. Fortunately, we have recommendations for how you can

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Lessons from Cities of Opportunity Pilot Initiative Drive Launch of New Technical Assistance RFP

The following presents brief highlights of the work of twelve cities in the Cities of Opportunity pilot. Based on what’s learned from these cities, NLC is launching recruitment for a new cohort and invite cities to apply. Click here to access the RFP. Cities of Opportunity are places where all residents can reach their full

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Racial Bias in Facial Recognition Technology: What City Leaders Should Know

On July 1 the City of San Francisco effected a ban on facial recognition technology—the first of its kind in the nation.  Aimed at leading with transparency, accountability and equity, the ban passed as part of the city’s Stop Secret Surveillance Ordinance.  While the city stopped testing facial recognition technology in 2007 and has not

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