Category: law enforcement

How Local Leaders Can Help Our Most Vulnerable Young People

City governments and city leaders continuously grapple with the costs of the “deep end” of the juvenile justice system. Deep-end youth include the roughly 30,000 young people placed in detention facilities who may be better served in targeted community-based services in the city. Deep-end youth constitute our most vulnerable and marginalized young people. Many deep-end

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What Triage Centers Mean for Cities, First-Responders and People in Crisis

Triage centers provide a strong opportunity to bring first responders and community-based service providers together to effectively address behavioral health crises and improve quality of life across a city. City leaders across the country are prioritizing better police responses to people suffering behavioral health crises, which include mental health or substance abuse crises.  Triage centers

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How Small Cities Can Address Addiction

Too often people suffering with addiction end up entangled in the criminal justice system, as substance misuse and addiction continue to increase across the nation as cities grapple with how to tackle the epidemic. Small cities can face the daunting challenge of addressing similar rates of addiction with less resources than larger cities. In November at

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City Leaders Should Consider Pre-Arrest Diversion

Several cities across the nation are embracing pre-arrest diversion to reduce mass incarceration. Pre-arrest diversion allows officers to divert a person into community services to receive treatment rather than arresting and jailing that person. Cities play an integral role in who enters local jails and are implementing programs and policies, such as pre-arrest diversion, that

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The Truth About the Curfew Myth

This is a guest post by Ivonne Roman, a captain in the Newark (N.J.) Police Department. Declaring a juvenile curfew to keep troublemaking teenagers off the streets is a summer ritual in many American cities. This year Austin, Texas decided not to sound the alarm. “We looked at the evidence and decided it was time

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Why the Census is Headed To SCOTUS

For more on how to prepare your city for the 2020 census visit NLC.org/census. In March 2018 Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross issued a memorandum stating a citizenship question would be added to the 2020 census questionnaire. In In Re Department of Commerce the Supreme Court will not be deciding whether this question may be

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MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge Awards Funding to 12 Cities and Counties

Last week the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge announced $22 million in new funding to support 12 new cities and counties working to reduce incarceration and 13 sites already part of the growing national movement. The National League of Cities (NLC) is proud to be part of the movement

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Making Cities Safe By Helping People Connect Beyond Their Differences

It is a pleasure to share my support of Relationships First and their program Safe Conversations with the National League of Cities (NLC).  As mayor Of Dallas, I watched Relationships First emerge in our city in 2014. They have disseminated a new relational science in various ecosystems here in Dallas with impactful results. I strongly recommend

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Cities Can Amplify Formerly Incarcerated Voices to Drive Justice Reform

This is a guest post form Ronald Simpson-Bey, who serves as the Director of Outreach and Alumni Engagement at JustLeadershipUSA. For any criminal justice reform policy to be truly effective, and for it to deliver the results that are long overdue — the decarceration and decriminalization of black and brown communities and communities experiencing poverty

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