Category: Juvenile justice reform

MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge Awards $11.3M to Local Sites

Jail misuse and overuse have taken a heavy toll on our communities. They have become warehouses for people with mental health and substance abuse issues — rather than a place for those who pose a flight risk or threat to public safety.  Local policy efforts and practices can contribute to the national movement to end mass incarceration.

Why Cities Should Support, Not Arrest, Homeless Youth

This is a guest post by NLC’s Lydia Lawrence. In America, young people who are homeless or face housing instability experience arrest and detention much more often than other youth. As many as 78 percent of the estimated 400,000 homeless youth in America have had at least one interaction with police and 44 percent have

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Five Ways Cities Can Lead on Juvenile Justice Reform

A new National League of Cities (NLC) report details how leadership in six cities furthered local juvenile justice reforms. The Annie E. Casey Foundation sponsored the report documenting the role of cities and mayors as new, powerful contributors to the national momentum toward developmentally appropriate reductions in the number of youth entering the juvenile justice

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Arrested Development: Adolescent Development & Juvenile Justice

As part of our efforts to promote professional development among city leaders, we often feature TED Talks focused on cities, community issues or local government. This week’s talk is presented by Elizabeth Cauffman, Professor and Chancellor’s Fellow in the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior at the University of California, Irvine. A 9th grader charged

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Mayors Continue Emphasis on Public Safety, New Approaches Emerging

This year’s National League of Cities analysis of State of the City speeches reaffirms that while mayors across the country continue to see public safety as a top issue, they’re employing new tactics and approaching the entire arena from a different perspective. Alongside other core priorities for city government such as infrastructure and economic development,

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How to Reduce Arrests of Young People in Your City

Missed our latest juvenile justice reform webinar? Not to worry, now you can watch and listen to Police Protocols to Reduce Arrests of Young People in Your City on YouTube. This webinar, which took place  on Friday, December 18, 2015, features Deputy Superintendent Michael Gropman of the Brookline, Massachusetts Police Department and Deputy Commissioner Kevin

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Three Supreme Court Cases that Impact Local Juvenile Justice Reform Efforts

This post was co-written by Laura E. Furr. In the last decade, the Supreme Court has ruled three times on the rights of juvenile offenders to be free from cruel and unusual punishment under the Eighth Amendment. These cases provide important context for city leaders joining a national movement for reforming juvenile justice practices to

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An Interaction with Police Doesn’t Have to Mean Detention for Young People

“Every interaction between police officers and our young people is, or can be, an opportunity for prevention or intervention.”   – Betsy Hodges, mayor, Minneapolis Decades of evidence support Mayor Hodges’ comment. Systems that overuse detention and other harsh corrections methods often make young people more likely to reoffend and in doing so, harm them, their

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