Category: Juvenile justice reform

What Triage Centers Mean for Cities, First-Responders and People in Crisis

Triage centers provide a strong opportunity to bring first responders and community-based service providers together to effectively address behavioral health crises and improve quality of life across a city. City leaders across the country are prioritizing better police responses to people suffering behavioral health crises, which include mental health or substance abuse crises.  Triage centers

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The Truth About the Curfew Myth

This is a guest post by Ivonne Roman, a captain in the Newark (N.J.) Police Department. Declaring a juvenile curfew to keep troublemaking teenagers off the streets is a summer ritual in many American cities. This year Austin, Texas decided not to sound the alarm. “We looked at the evidence and decided it was time

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MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge Awards Funding to 12 Cities and Counties

Last week the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge announced $22 million in new funding to support 12 new cities and counties working to reduce incarceration and 13 sites already part of the growing national movement. The National League of Cities (NLC) is proud to be part of the movement

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Tailoring Reengagement Strategies For America’s ‘Opportunity Youth’

As American as apple pie, “freedom” and “opportunity” are the ideals our country is supposed to represent — and that every city leader strives toward. But for too many young people today, opportunity is a promise unfulfilled, and their freedom to choose what to do, who to be, and how to live is only nominal.

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How Cities Can Reduce Recidivism for Young Adults

This is a guest post from Emily Morgan, director of content development at the Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center. As jurisdictions work to increase public safety and reduce corrections costs, a growing number have been exploring strategies targeted at improving outcomes for what is often the most challenging population under justice system supervision: young

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Accelerating Justice Reform and Criminal Record Clearance in Cities

The Council of State Governments (CSG), with funding support from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration and the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance, recently launched the Clean Slate Clearinghouse to support criminal record clearance efforts across the country. On March 27 at 3:00 p.m. EST, the National League of

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MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge Awards $11.3M to Local Sites

Jail misuse and overuse have taken a heavy toll on our communities. They have become warehouses for people with mental health and substance abuse issues — rather than a place for those who pose a flight risk or threat to public safety.  Local policy efforts and practices can contribute to the national movement to end mass incarceration.

Why Cities Should Support, Not Arrest, Homeless Youth

This is a guest post by NLC’s Lydia Lawrence. In America, young people who are homeless or face housing instability experience arrest and detention much more often than other youth. As many as 78 percent of the estimated 400,000 homeless youth in America have had at least one interaction with police and 44 percent have

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Five Ways Cities Can Lead on Juvenile Justice Reform

A new National League of Cities (NLC) report details how leadership in six cities furthered local juvenile justice reforms. The Annie E. Casey Foundation sponsored the report documenting the role of cities and mayors as new, powerful contributors to the national momentum toward developmentally appropriate reductions in the number of youth entering the juvenile justice

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Arrested Development: Adolescent Development & Juvenile Justice

As part of our efforts to promote professional development among city leaders, we often feature TED Talks focused on cities, community issues or local government. This week’s talk is presented by Elizabeth Cauffman, Professor and Chancellor’s Fellow in the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior at the University of California, Irvine. A 9th grader charged

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