Category: Infrastructure

“The Next American Economy”

According to an article from the New York Times, the city of Chicago is preparing to partner with the private sector to invest $7 billion in transit, schools and parks.  In the article, Mayor Emanuel hints that this is the kind of drastic investment that will be required for “building a new Chicago.”  In fact,

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The State of the Cities in 2012: Focus on Infrastructure Investment

This is the sixth in a seven-part series about mayors’ 2012 State of the City Speeches. As the rest of America waits for the Federal Government to get its act together and pass a comprehensive transportation bill, cities across the country are recognizing the opportunities that continued infrastructure improvements are having in their cities.  Leslie

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Local Officials behind Growing Support for CDBG, but Process and Partisanship Remain Significant Challenge

For the 7000 cities and towns that receive Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds each year, directly or indirectly, concerns are growing that that the foundation for transformative community projects is beginning to crumble.  Over the last two years, Congress has cut funding for the CDBG program over 25 percent, from about $4 billion to

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Innovation and Cities: Reframing the Dialogue

The first installment in a series on “Innovation and Cities” These are tough times for cities, economically and politically.  Our own research points to a period of managed retrenchment where city leaders are confronted with undesirable choices — cuts in vital services, laying off personnel, delaying needed infrastructure investments, to name a few.  But, times

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Curitiba’s Former Mayor Lerner Offers Valuable Reflections on Designing Sustainable Cities

Last week, Embarq, in conjunction with the other major players in the development world (think: international banks), hosted the ninth annual “Transforming Transportation” Conference to share model practices,  meet with colleagues doing similar work, and address sustainable transport issues worldwide.  This year’s conference focused on “scaling up” – that is, finding ways to emulate/adapt/multiply current

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Pedestrian Firenze

During most times of the day throughout the entire year, the narrow and often times cobble stone streets of Firenze (Florence), Italy are not so much roadways as they are large sidewalks.  Mayor Matteo Renzi is serious about protecting and preserving the historic character of his city – the cradle of the Renaissance.  During his

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Don’t Discount the Value of a Library in a Digital World

Great cities have great central libraries. Some are architecturally significant such as in Seattle or Copenhagen. Others are signature buildings that embody the civic spirit and unique character of a community, such as in Fort Smith, Arkansas where the citizens voted to tax themselves in order to build a main library building and neighborhood branches.

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Technology Wars Yield Efficiencies for Cities

Pick up nearly any magazine devoted to business, finance, technology or consumers and you will learn the details of the war being waged by corporate kingpins Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook. Ostensibly this competition is supposed to be good for the average consumer whether individual or corporate. This assumes of course that the average consumer

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America in the Last Lane

As any competitive or recreational swimmer knows, the swimming pool has a strict hierarchy of performance and expectation. At one end of the pool are the fast lanes and at the other end are the slow lanes. In the fast lanes are found the competitive tri-athletes, the varsity collegiate swimmers and the Olympic wannabees. For

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Rebranding Infrastructure

What might Hill & Knowlton, Fleishman-Hillard or Edelman Public Relations do if they were given the marketing campaign for INFRASTRUCTURE? It’s a terrible word in desperate need of rebranding.  What self-respecting PR firm would not jump at the chance to persuade Americans to spend their hard earned dollars on infrastructure instead of tablets or timeshares?

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