Category: immigration

In the Senate, Immigration Reform Hits a Wall

This week, the Senate took up debate on immigration reform, a long-awaited moment for both this chamber and the country. On the table were several politically charged issues, including both the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and President Trump’s proposed border wall. But after a week of unsuccessful bargaining and a series of

Continue reading

Second Court Orders Trump to Temporarily Maintain DACA

This week, the Supreme Court is expected to decide whether it will review a California federal court’s temporary nationwide injunction to maintain the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. It’s a case that has shaken the national immigration debate and put the Trump administration in a bind regarding enforcement. Now, a federal district court in

Continue reading

In Letter, Department of Justice Again Challenges “Sanctuary Jurisdictions”

Once again, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has sent letters to 23 jurisdictions (fourteen cities, six counties and three states) demanding proof that each jurisdiction is not restricting the sharing of citizenship or immigration status information by its law enforcement officers or other government officials with federal immigration authorities. The DOJ is accusing these jurisdictions

Continue reading

Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Legal Challenges to Third Travel Ban

In Trump v. Hawaii, the Ninth Circuit temporarily struck down President Trump’s third travel ban. Because of a Supreme Court order issued in December 2017, however, the third travel ban is currently in effect, regardless of the Ninth Circuit ruling. Now, the Supreme Court has agreed to review the Ninth Circuit decision — and an

Continue reading

Judge Orders Trump Administration to Temporarily Maintain DACA

A federal district court has issued a temporary nationwide injunction requiring the Trump administration to maintain much of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Four states (California, Maine, Maryland, and Minnesota) and two local governments (San Jose and Santa Clara County) are among the plaintiffs who sued the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

Continue reading

Ninth Circuit Temporarily Strikes Down Third Travel Ban

When, last month, the Ninth Circuit issued an opinion temporarily striking down President Trump’s third travel ban, the move was met with little fanfare. There are two likely reasons. First, the decision came down right before Christmas (December 22). And in early December, the Supreme Court allowed the third travel ban to go into effect until

Continue reading

Trump’s Travel Ban Has Taken Effect. Now What?

The Supreme Court has allowed the third travel ban to go into effect at least temporarily while two federal circuit courts of appeals review decisions from lower courts temporarily blocking enforcement of the travel ban. Even if the government loses before the appeals courts the travel ban will remain in effect until the Supreme Court

Continue reading

Court Permanently Strikes Down Trump Sanctuary Cities Order

In April, a federal district court issued a nationwide preliminary injunction preventing the Trump administration from enforcing the sanctuary jurisdictions portion of the Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States executive order (EO). Now, the same federal court has made that injunction permanent — effectively halting enforcement until further notice. According to

Continue reading

Federal District Court Rules in Favor of Philadelphia in Sanctuary Jurisdiction Case

Congress created the Edward Byrne Justice Assistance Grants (Byrne JAG) in 2005 to provide “flexible” funding for state and local police departments. In April 2017 the Department of Justice (DOJ) required Philadelphia (and eight other jurisdictions) to provide documentation that it complies with 8 U.S.C. 1373, which prohibits states and local governments from restricting employees

Continue reading

Will the Supreme Court Review Trump’s Third Travel Ban?

If Attorney General Jeff Sessions has his way, the answer will be yes. Or at least, so Sessions told the Senate Judiciary Committee — shortly after two federal district courts temporarily prevented the third travel ban from going into effect. But the full story is more complicated. Back on March 6, President Trump signed an executive

Continue reading