Category: immigration

DACA Survives… For Now

In a 5-4 decision in DHS v. Regents of the University of California, the Supreme Court held that the decision to wind-down the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program violated the Administrative Procedures Act (APA). It is possible the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will try again to end DACA. DACA was established by

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Despite COVID-19, SCOTUS Refuses to Stop Use of New Public Charge Definition

The Supreme Court refused to lift its stay of federal court orders that prevented the Trump administration from making changes to the definition of public charge. Immigrants who are deemed a “public charge” are ineligible to receive green cards/lawful permanent resident status. The most recent definition of public charge, adopted in 1999, included immigrants who

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New Presidential Proclamation Limits Green Cards Temporarily

When President Trump tweeted that he intended to temporarily suspend immigration into the United States due to COVID-19 no one quite knew what to expect. The presidential proclamation prevents foreign nationals who are outside of the United States now and for the next 60 days (possibly longer if the proclamation is extended) from applying for legal permanent

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COVID-19 Guidance for Immigrant Rich Communities

Communities with large immigrant populations may be at risk for greater exposure to COVID-19 because of new rules that have been implemented by the Trump Administration. These rules include increased enforcement efforts to remove all undocumented immigrants, implementation of stricter public charge rules and closure of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) offices which process

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SCOTUS Allows Public Charge Rules to Go into Effect Temporarily

The Supreme Court has stayed a nationwide injunction which disallowed the public charge rule from going into effect anywhere in the United States. For now, the public charge rule will remain in effect across the country (except in Illinois) until the Second Circuit, and the Supreme Court, if it decides to get involved, rules in

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Racial Bias in Facial Recognition Technology: What City Leaders Should Know

On July 1 the City of San Francisco effected a ban on facial recognition technology—the first of its kind in the nation.  Aimed at leading with transparency, accountability and equity, the ban passed as part of the city’s Stop Secret Surveillance Ordinance.  While the city stopped testing facial recognition technology in 2007 and has not

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What Makes A Resident? Counting Your Community for the 2020 Census

Municipal governments have an important relationship with the census — both as consumers of the data it gathers and as partners in ensuring the complete and accurate count of our cities. Data produced by the census are critical to our democratic system and improves our ability to function as one of the world’s largest countries

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What’s Next for the Census Citizenship Question?

A federal district court has held that a question about citizenship may not be included in the 2020 census. The Trump administration is likely to appeal this ruling to the Second Circuit, and it is likely the Supreme Court will ultimately resolve the dispute. Additional challenges to including this question have been brought but not

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What the Shutdown Means for the Census

Unlike many other federal agencies, the U.S. Census Bureau has an unusual budget that waxes and wanes in 10-year intervals as it prepares for America’s largest domestic mobilization effort — the decennial census. While the Bureau typically survives government shutdowns with minimal long-term impacts, this particular shutdown comes right as the Bureau begins its final

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Top 10 Most Popular Blog Posts From 2018

From small cell preemption to Amazon’s HQ search and downtown development, here are CitiesSpeak’s top posts from 2018. Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Legal Challenges to Third Travel Ban In considering Trump’s controversial immigration policy, the Supreme Court will focus on four key legal issues. What City Leaders Should Know about South Dakota v. Wayfair

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