Category: Identity

Fifty Years After MLK, Cities Must Confront Racial Equity Through Policy

Today, we remember the defining figure of the Civil Rights Era, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. On the fiftieth anniversary of his assassination, leaders and communities across the country are taking the opportunity to reflect on our nation’s history, the progress we’ve made, and how much work we have yet to do. From Ferguson

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Can Tucson, Arizona Bring Back its Miracle Mile?

In cities, certain neighborhoods may have a history that gave them an economic purpose, a distinctive aesthetic identity, and unique role in their city decades ago — even if time has moved on. When those neighborhoods fall on hard times, that identity can sour from a source of pride to one of perceived blight. And

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Why Women Must Lead Together

Across the country, women knit together the fabric of our communities. As residents, business entrepreneur and, of course, as local officials, women lead by action and example. At the National League of Cities, we’re proud of the women who have answered the call of service and taken office. NLC celebrates them this month by sharing their

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Unleashing Latino-Owned Business Potential in Cities

This is a guest post by Sarah Alvarez, senior program associate at the Aspen Institute Latinos and Society Program. In the United States, Latino-Americans start businesses at three times the rate of the general population. That means they play an important role in driving US economic vibrancy — through their outsized contribution to new business creation.

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Our Eight Most Popular Articles of 2017

In January 2017, America’s cities faced a precarious moment. After several years of runaway growth in downtowns and neighborhoods, major cities were at their most wealthy, safe, and vibrant point in decades. Meanwhile, mid-sized cities and small towns continued to struggle with growing challenges — and a divisive 2016 campaign season had laid those inequalities

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State of the Cities: Leading the Way in Racial Equity Through Speech And Action

NLC’s 2017 State of the Cities analysis reveals how much mayors are using their public platforms to call attention to the issues of inequities based on race and ethnicity facing their cities. The Race, Equity And Leadership (REAL) initiative at NLC supports local elected officials to build a foundation on this first step to create

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Cities Apply Lessons from Veteran Homelessness to Help Senior Veterans

Last month at the University of North Carolina’s School of Journalism in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, NLC joined with Purple Heart Homes, the Housing Assistance Council, and The Home Depot Foundation to discuss the housing needs of senior veterans. As cities respond to changing age demographics among the entire population, lessons from the progress on

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Will the Supreme Court Review Trump’s Third Travel Ban?

If Attorney General Jeff Sessions has his way, the answer will be yes. Or at least, so Sessions told the Senate Judiciary Committee — shortly after two federal district courts temporarily prevented the third travel ban from going into effect. But the full story is more complicated. Back on March 6, President Trump signed an executive

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15 Cities Selected for New “Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation” Initiative

Across the country, issues of racial equity continue to spark unrest in communities. In cities and towns both small and large, our country has been made to repeatedly stare into the face of our scarred past — and to acknowledge the long road ahead. In order to provide support to city leaders and communities dealing

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Racial Equity in America: It’s Not So Black and White

This is a co-authored post by Leon T. Andrews, Jr., director of NLC’s Race, Equity And Leadership (REAL) initiative, and Kiara Aponte, NLC’s REAL intern. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s latest projection, by 2044 people of color will make up more than half of the U.S. population — meaning that in just 30 years non-Hispanic

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