Category: Federal Government

How Can Cities Become More Disaster Resilient?

Three historic hurricanes. Wildfires in the West. Increased frequency nuisance flooding and heavy rainfall. As extreme weather continues to dominate the headlines, in 2017 what can city leaders do to protect their communities? Last week, NLC and the Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI) co-hosted a Congressional Briefing entitled “How Can Cities Become More Resilient

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Why America Should Invest in Afterschool and Summer Programs

This is a guest post by Mayor Karen Best of Branson, Missouri. As mayor of Branson, one of my primary responsibilities is ensuring the sustainability and prosperity of our community. There is no better way to ensure our city’s future than providing our young people with opportunities to learn and grow in a safe environment

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Six Steps for a Great Public Stakeholder Meeting

Every city has aspirations and concerns beyond its own borders. When Americans elect their local officials, they’re not just looking for day-to-day task managers — they’re entrusting leaders with their city’s future. One of the greatest tools available to deliver on that promise is the stakeholder meeting. For federal advocacy campaigns like #FightTheCuts, stakeholder meetings

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2018 Supreme Court Preview for Local Governments

Lisa Soronen details the four most interesting cases for local governments to be reviewed this coming fall — plus one monumental case still under consideration that will affect every city in America. Most of the Supreme Court’s interesting grants for its new term (beginning the first Monday in October) usually come in the fall. It

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District Court Refuses to Reconsider Sanctuary Jurisdictions Ruling

The court rejected the weight the Department of Justice tried to place on the recent memo from Attorney General Jeff Sessions, concluding it is not likely a binding legal opinion. So, is the executive order currently enforceable? In April, a federal district court issued a nationwide preliminary injunction preventing the Trump Administration from enforcing the

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Tax Reform: A Primer or Another False Start?

While summer in Washington, D.C., is a time typically marked by six weeks of Congressional recess, the talk of tax reform is heating up in the nation’s capital. With the release of the anticipated House budget blueprint, titled “Building A Better America,” it seems legislators are ready to turn their attention from healthcare to tax

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Supreme Court Review for Local Governments: June 2017

In the last month of its term (June), the Supreme Court often issues opinions at a dizzying pace. Below is a very brief summary of the cases decided last month affecting local governments. When it comes to big cases, the Supreme Court’s last term was the quietest in recent memory. For local governments, though, the

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Local Leaders Take a Stand for the State and Local Tax Deduction

This post was co-authored by Brett Bolton and Will Downie. City and county leaders took to Capitol Hill this week to discuss a critical but often overlooked part of the federal tax code: the state and local tax deduction (SALT). The deduction plays a critical role in helping cities provide vital services such as healthcare,

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In Congress, NLC Experts Discuss the State of America’s Cities

What is the state of America’s cities and towns? Where are our most successful and our most challenged communities? What should the federal government’s role in cities be — and is there a road map to urban success? On Wednesday, NLC Second Vice President Karen Freeman-Wilson, mayor, Gary, Indiana, and NLC Senior Executive Brooks Rainwater

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Nonprofits and Philanthropies Can Help Create Affordable Housing in Your City

America’s mayors have stated that affordable housing, particularly for the homeless, is an issue of primary concern in their cities. NLC’s Elisha Harig-Blaine shares the story of one homeless veteran who was able to obtain housing — but only with the help of a local nonprofit in partnership with the city. For the fourth consecutive

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