Category: economic opportunity

Get Out of Your Lane: How Transportation Leaders Can Shape the Road Ahead

On November 28, National League of Cities (NLC) CEO and Executive Director Clarence E. Anthony spoke to 250 transportation executives at the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) Industry Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C. Excerpts from his remarks are included below. Transportation is much more than just a set of systems — it’s what connects citizens

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DHS Public Charge Proposed Rulemaking Threatens Economic Vitality of Cities

On Thursday, November 29, the National League of Cities submitted comments in response to the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) notice of proposed rulemaking to expand the definition of a “public charge.” NLC has been active on the public charge issue for many years, including engaging with other state and local government organizations on the impact

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What’s a First Tier Suburb, Anyway?

This is a guest post by Councilmember John Holman of Auburn, Washington. There is a good likelihood that you are an elected official from a first tier suburb. An older, less-used term is ring suburb. Simply put, if your city is influenced by a large, urban, metropolitan area, chances are you are one of us.

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Working Together to Strengthen Our Cities

This is a guest post by Tim Sloan, CEO and president, Wells Fargo & Company Wells Fargo is pleased to partner with cities around the U.S. to improve the communities where we all live and work. We’ve been doing it for generations, and it’s a part of our company culture that makes me most proud! I

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Yes, Cities Can Pilot Universal Basic Income

Cities face a number of labor-related challenges, including job automation, precarious work arrangements, economic insecurity and growing inequality. Universal basic income (UBI) is a potential solution. UBI is an unconditional cash payment that either supplements or replaces existing social welfare systems. Unlike traditional programs, which are conditional and means-tested, UBI provides recipients with the autonomy

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The Future of Work is Change

Since January of this year, the National League of Cities (NLC) has been focused in a significant way on the #FutureofWork in cities. We’ve been conducting and publishing new research, highlighting promising practices, holding convenings, developing new educational opportunities and programming, and engaging new partners. We’ve been working hard to stay on top of this issue,

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Urban-Rural by the Numbers

This is the fourth post in a series about reducing the divide between urban and rural communities. To bridge the gap between urban and rural areas, we first need to understand what sets these communities apart and where they have common ground. Below are a few key stats about urban and rural populations, economies and housing, and

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The Future of Work for Opportunity Youth

Opportunity youth comprise a large share of the nearly five million 16-24 year olds out of school and out of work across the U.S. The group has one of the least secure footholds in the evolving structure of employment. Not only do these young people lack jobs; many also lack the training and credentials to

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Why Workforce Development Matters for Mayors

For the past five years, NLC’s Center for City Solutions has analyzed mayors’ state of the cities speeches, which highlight the priorities mayors are focusing on. The 2018 State of Cities (SOTC) report has a sample of 160 mayoral speeches between January and April 2018 and includes cities of all population sizes and across geographic

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For Cities, Opportunity Starts at Home

The National League of Cities’ (NLC) Community and Economic Development Committee is consistently one of the largest of NLC’s seven advocacy committees. That makes sense, given that survey after survey has shown that economic development is consistently among the top priorities identified by local elected officials. It doesn’t seem to matter how well or poorly

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