Category: Civility

An Imperative for our Time: Defining and Supporting a Well-Being Agenda for Cities

This is guest post by Tyler Norris, chief executive of Well Being Trust. Across America, city leaders — not just mayors and other elected leaders, but also philanthropists, business owners and community organization professionals — know that promoting health and well-being is not just about having enough hospitals and doctors. Over the past three decades,

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Why the Census is Headed To SCOTUS

For more on how to prepare your city for the 2020 census visit NLC.org/census. In March 2018 Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross issued a memorandum stating a citizenship question would be added to the 2020 census questionnaire. In In Re Department of Commerce the Supreme Court will not be deciding whether this question may be

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5 Things Cities Can Be Grateful for This Thanksgiving

Elected officials rarely get the chance to pause and reflect. For many of us, elected office is a second—or third—job, and there is always another project to complete, another problem that must be solved, or a council meeting to attend. The truth is—most of us like it that way. As local leaders, it’s in our

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What’s a First Tier Suburb, Anyway?

This is a guest post by Councilmember John Holman of Auburn, Washington. There is a good likelihood that you are an elected official from a first tier suburb. An older, less-used term is ring suburb. Simply put, if your city is influenced by a large, urban, metropolitan area, chances are you are one of us.

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Preparing for the 2020 Census

Today, the National League of Cities (NLC) released Preparing for the 2020 Census, a new municipal action guide that will help cities navigate the upcoming census. Visit NLC.org/census to find the full guide. Even before the U.S. Constitution outlines the powers of the three branches of the government, it mandates a decennial count of all

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Making Cities Safe By Helping People Connect Beyond Their Differences

It is a pleasure to share my support of Relationships First and their program Safe Conversations with the National League of Cities (NLC).  As mayor Of Dallas, I watched Relationships First emerge in our city in 2014. They have disseminated a new relational science in various ecosystems here in Dallas with impactful results. I strongly recommend

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Supreme Court Will Hear First Amendment Retaliatory Arrest Case

Every year, the Supreme Court hears and rules in a wide variety of difficult cases. And when it comes to the legal matters at stake, some tend to pop up once, while others recur over years or decades. But in recent years, no issue has vexed the court quite like one nagging question: whether probable cause

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Labor Day Essay: Aretha Franklin, John McCain, and the Embodiment of Respect

As summer winds to its unofficial close and we take a moment to celebrate the social and economic achievements of U.S. workers, it’s remarkably appropriate that we’re simultaneously celebrating the labor and legacy of two American icons. One, the Queen of Soul and the voice of a generation. The other, a war hero and dedicated

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Man Arrested for Disrupting Council Meetings Can Sue, Supreme Court Says

According to the Supreme Court, Riviera Beach, Florida, resident Fane Lozman may be the only person to fit within a “unique class of retaliatory arrest claims.” It may not be a very auspicious honor — but the designation was all it took for Lozman to win his (second) Supreme Court case. In an 8-1 decision

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Public Spaces and Local Democracy

On Tuesday, the Tennessee House of Representatives voted to exact revenge on the city of Memphis — approving a measure to withhold $250,000 in funding that had been appropriated for the city’s bicentennial anniversary celebration. A little backstory is required. In December, two statues of Confederate leaders were removed from Memphis parks — a long-awaited

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