Category: city administration

The First Amendment is Not the Last Word at Public Meetings

Managing public comments at city council meetings isn’t easy. Review this framework to be prepared for disruptions. This is a guest post by Ann G. Macfarlane. In this country today, the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is the foundation of our civil liberty. The freedoms that it lists are crucial to our society. When

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How Cities Can Train Police Officers Not to Shoot

American soldiers are provided with extensive training that outlines strict rules of engagement and emphasizes the use of force as a last resort. Why aren’t we providing our police officers with the same level of training? Police shootings occur nearly every day in America. Many are justified, but many are unnecessary and avoidable. When investigations

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A Smarter Way to Make Smart Cities

Though it may seem counterintuitive, small interventions powered by small companies can have almost as large of an impact on cities as expensive, big business projects for only a fraction of the price. Songdo, South Korea has been billed as the world’s first “smart city.” (Image: Gale International) This is a guest post by Isabel

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NLC Hosts 2015 State Municipal League Summer Meetings

This is a guest post by Emma Lieberth. Every year, the National League of Cities organizes two annual conferences for the 49 state municipal leagues. This year, the State Municipal League Staff Workshop was held in Philadelphia, Penn., from July 15-17 and the State Municipal League Executive Directors Workshop was held in Detroit, August 4-7.

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How to Build a New Type of Urban Practice: Analyzing NLC’s Economic Indicators Report

This is a guest post by Ben Hecht. This post is the first installment in a series focused on NLC’s 2015 Cities and Unequal Recovery report, which highlights the findings of our 2015 Local Economic Conditions survey. If we want to see dramatically better results, we need new ways of solving the complex problems facing

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New Evidence That the Tax Exemption Matters

Tax-exempt municipal bonds provide support for infrastructure projects such as the Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Bridge in Boston, pictured above. (photo: Will Damon) Walking down Commonwealth Avenue in Boston this summer, it was hard to imagine more than six feet of snow in this very place not more than a few months prior. Although

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How the Nashville Metro Area Became the First True City-County Consolidated Government

This is a guest post by the 2015 Congress of Cities Nashville Host City Team. Fall color and the Metro Courthouse and Public Square in downtown Nashville, Tenn. Nashville, known as Music City due to its premier role in the music world, is also a pioneering force for efficient government. In 1963, Nashville’s elected, business

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Seven Significant Supreme Court Cases for Local Governments

The Supreme Court ruled on a number of cases this term that will affect local governments. (markphariss/Getty Images) That same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marry and the Affordable Care Act remains intact will forever outshine every other decision from this Supreme Court term. But local governments will ignore the rest of this term

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Retention and Attraction Strategies for a Balanced Retail Sector

This is a recap from Big Ideas for Small Business, NLC’s national peer network helping local governments accelerate effort to support small businesses and encourage entrepreneurship. To learn more, email robbins@nlc.org. Neighborhood institutions, such as the Empress of China restaurant in San Francisco, are often forced to close their doors due to escalating rent prices

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For Children & Families This Spring, April Showers Bring More Than May Flowers

President Obama recently signed into law the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015. This comes as great news to city leaders such as Mayor Jorge Elorza, who is working to expand health coverage for children and families in Providence, R.I. From left to right: U.S. Senator Jack Reed (D-RI), Jorge Elorza, mayor of

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