Category: city administration

Three Ways the Cloud Helps Communities Grow and Thrive

This is a guest post by Kimberly Nelson, Executive Director of the U.S. Public Sector’s State and Local Government Solutions, Microsoft Corporation and Troy Coggiola, Chief Product Officer, Accela. Government agencies strive to improve the quality of life for their citizens, ensuring equitable access to services and desired businesses, smart community development and overall public health and

Continue reading

Three Ways Atlanta is Building Green, Equitable Redevelopment

Economic development, land use and public infrastructure—across the country, cities contend with these three challenges daily. In many ways, the City of Atlanta is no different. In her first State of the City speech, Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said, “We are committed to bringing Atlanta together, so that every person and every community is empowered

Continue reading

City Council Presidents from across America Convene in Chicago

This is a guest blog from President Pro Tempore Margaret Laurino of the Chicago City Council.  To my right, Council President Bernard “Jack” Young of Baltimore wants to focus on questions of equity. To my left, Vice Mayor David Luna of Mesa, Arizona says the upcoming 2020 Census is one of the top issues on

Continue reading

How Bus Rapid Transit Could Fight Congestion in Pinecrest, Florida

This blog post is part of a series on rebuilding and reimagining America’s infrastructure for NLC’s Rebuild With Us campaign. This is a guest post by Councilmember James McDonald of Pinecrest, Florida. U.S. Highway 1 in Miami-Dade County is not fun to drive. Each day, our local drivers spend hours of lost time, burn thousands of

Continue reading

Reclaiming Our Local Democracy

In Chattanooga, Tennessee, the city is not permitted to extend its municipal broadband service to woefully underserved rural neighbors, despite widespread support from people who live there. The city of St. Petersburg, Florida, is prevented from regulating the plastic bags and drinking straws that litter their waterways and harm wildlife. In every case, these cities

Continue reading

Women in Politics: P is for Power

Across the country, women knit together the fabric of our communities. As residents, business entrepreneur and, of course, as local officials, women lead by action and example. At the National League of Cities, we’re proud of the women who have answered the call of service and taken office. NLC celebrates them this month by sharing their

Continue reading

What Cities Are Doing About Pensions

In advance of our annual State of the Cities report, which will be released later this year, this blog series captures speeches given by mayors in 2017. This blog is part two of a four-part series focused on mayoral dialogues and sentiments around the fiscal responsibility of the city and the retirement needs of the

Continue reading

Preemption Threatens Economic Development and Innovation

City leaders work every day to grow local ecosystems in their communities that support entrepreneurs. They do this in many ways – attracting and retaining talent, offering support services, and creating vibrant urban places. This work takes place in the urban sphere because innovation thrives in cities. Cities are central to the progress of our

Continue reading

Five Strategies For Growing Small Businesses in 2018

Last year, Big Ideas for Small Business, NLC’s national peer network on small business development, convened several times to discuss innovative new approaches for supporting local businesses. Many of these successful  strategies are ones you should considering implementing in your own city. Below is a brief recap of our key strategies from 2017. Leveraging Libraries

Continue reading

How Cities Can Use Retirement Benefits To Recruit Talent

This is a co-authored post by Anita Yadavalli, program director for city fiscal policy in NLC’s Center for City Solutions, and Jean-Pierre Aubry, associate director of state and local research at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. It is the third piece in a three-part series about pensions and healthcare. Each piece includes insights gained

Continue reading