Category: General

Places and People are Keys to Thriving Cities

Efforts at “place making” have seldom been so visible in both federal policy and local initiative.  But author Edward Glaeser in his popular work Triumph of the City, suggests that a focus on place is truly, well, misplaced.  “Invest in people,” Glaeser advocates, because at their best cities are job-creating engines that put talent to

Continue reading

A Changing Paradigm: Cities and Regions Embracing Global Interdependence

Distrustful, inward-looking and even smug…U.S. local officials have been called it all when it comes to describing their attitudes toward strengthening global economic interdependence.  And this is part of a broader story about the U.S., that we are unwilling to look to global partners to help restore economic growth.  Perhaps in certain places at certain

Continue reading

Budget Compromise is Only the Beginning

This week we’ve been receiving a lot of phone calls on the budget compromise and where cities came out. NLC, in coordination with cities and towns across the nation, fought hard to preserve priority investments in cities. The issues NLC identified as priorities – like Community Development Block Grants – help our cities get back

Continue reading

Touching the Tigers

The most extraordinary heroes generally prove to be average and ordinary folk. Glen Beneda was one case in point. A fighter pilot in World War II, it was his actions after the war that defined the true measure of his heroism.  Beneda fought the Japanese in the air over China as a member of the

Continue reading

Former Mayor Helping Cities on a Global Level

Joan Clos has held many titles in his life – doctor, mayor, minister and ambassador. Late in 2010 he added a new title to his resume: Executive Director of United Nations Habitat. In this new role he will have the opportunity to bring his considerable talents in urban planning, housing, job creation and diplomacy to

Continue reading

State of the Cities in 2011: Prioritizing Public Safety

This is the final post of a seven-part series about mayors’ 2011 State of the City speeches. Given the dire state of many municipal budgets, it makes sense that local governments are trying to trim the fat and balance budgets.  However, one area where there is always hesitancy to make cuts is public safety.  In

Continue reading

State of the Cities in 2011: A New Era of Regional Collaboration

This is the sixth in a seven-part series about mayors’ 2011 State of the City speeches. Mayor John Monaco of Mesquite, Texas quoted late President Ronald Reagan in his 2011 State of the City speech when he said, “A recession is when your neighbor loses his job…a depression is when you lose yours.”  While neighboring

Continue reading

State of the Cities in 2011: Infrastructure a Prerequisite for Economic Success

This is the fifth in a seven-part series about mayors’ 2011 State of the City speeches. In difficult economic times, the need to invest in city infrastructure—transportation, public works and technology—does not decline.  Rather, residents still expect usable roads, transit options, clean water and technological advances.  And as cities struggle to maintain economic competitiveness, mayors

Continue reading

State of the Cities in 2011: What Are Mayors Saying About Economic Development?

This is the fourth in a seven-part series about mayors’ 2011 State of the City speeches. In various “State of the City” addresses, local leaders stressed that the best way to improve their city’s economic position is to increase investment within the city, which they admit is no easy task.  Whether it’s through promoting second

Continue reading

State of the Cities in 2011: Building a More Efficient Government

This is the second in a seven-part series about mayors’ 2011 State of the City speeches. In a nation where fiscal responsibility is in the spotlight, and groups are grappling for funding, the “State of the City” addresses we read clearly show that city governments are in search of ways to balance their budgets. Unfortunately,

Continue reading