Category: General

Residents Matter as Washington, DC Gets Ready to Create its First Sustainability Plan

This past Wednesday, over 400 residents of Washington, DC gathered in the Convention Center to form working groups that will inform the content of the city’s first sustainability plan.  The energy in the room was palpable, as Mayor Gray restated his vision to make Washington “the greenest city in the nation.” After introductory words from

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Todays unemployment numbers

The following post was written by Neil Bomberg, program director in NLC’s Center on Federal Relations: November’s unemployment numbers, which were released today by the Bureau of Labor Statistics or BLS, provide further evidence that the economy is continuing to improve after suffering the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. At first glance, last

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Green Riverside Impresses at the Congress of Cities

Last week, I arrived at the Congress of Cities in Phoenix, both excited and anxious about meeting our members and working a large conference for the very first time.  Would I be in the right place at the right time? Would I have answers for the questions that our members might ask?  For the most

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Innovation in city programs: How do we know it when we see it?

Amid persistent attention placed on cities struggling to make ends meet, cities across the country are also engaged in countless efforts to improve the quality of life for their residents. In many cases, these quality of life improvements are strong ammunition against local hardship. It’s easy for cities to get bogged down in their own struggles, but in order

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CITY YEAR — Always Ready!

Freedom Plaza, across from city hall in Washington, D.C., is presently the camp site for Occupy Wall Street, the anti-corporate greed campaign sweeping the nation. While I have no philosophical problems with the protest agenda, I do resent the fact that their use of the Plaza has displaced the morning calisthenics of the Washington cadre

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More Than Just A Market

I never thought of the present-day farmers market as the modern equivalent of the Greek Agora or the Roman Forum. Certainly a marketplace, like the historic Eastern Market near the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., is a community space for multiple purposes only one of which is commercial. On any given day, but especially on

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Go Tell the Spartans

Lansing, Michigan – The Spartans of old were the lightly armed, highly determined warriors that defended the pass at Thermopylae in 480 B.C. against a vastly superior force of Persians, bent on the complete destruction of Greece. The modern Spartans are the lightly armed and highly determined municipal officials who battle to prevent Michigan from

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Whitney Says Earthquake is Sign of De(Fault) Problem

August is a slow month in D.C.  and we thought we’d add some humor to the post-Earthquake news cycle.  Obviously, none of the statements or quotes in this post are real. Financial analyst Meredith Whitney said that the recent earthquake in the mid-Atlantic region is yet another sign of underlying instability in the municipal bond

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Economic Benefits of Green Cities

This post is written by Caitlin Geary, Associate within the Finance and Economic Development Program, Center for Research and Innovation at the National League of Cities. As energy and transportation costs rise, market demand for “green” grows and budget cuts continue to loom, communities are increasingly realizing the multiple benefits linking sustainability, cost savings and economic

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The Active Living Imperative

The issue of obesity is oft discussed in the media and by healthy living figureheads like Michelle Obama as the cause for many of our country’s ills.  Mrs. Obama fights to introduce healthy, affordable produce into our food deserts (discussed eloquently in this recent blog post), and champions increased physical activity for children.  For adults,

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