Category: broadband internet

New FCC Resources on Disaster Response and Public Safety

There are new recommendations out from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that local elected officials should use as resources around improving emergency communications. This set of four reports comes from the Intergovernmental Advisory Committee (IAC), a group of state, local, tribal, and territorial officials appointed by the FCC leadership to develop recommendations on communications policy matters

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NLC, Local Allies Oppose Wireless Petitions Before FCC

NLC is continuing the fight against telecom preemption. We have joined a number of local governments and municipal organizations throughout the country in opposition to recent proposals from the Wireless Industry Association (WIA) and the Communications Technology Industry Association (CTIA). These proposals aim to further limit local oversight of wireless towers and pole attachments. The

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Net Neutrality Gives Cities Some Flexibility

You may have seen headlines that a federal court handed a partial victory to advocates for net neutrality recently. But what exactly did the court do, and what does that mean for cities? Net neutrality requires internet service providers to treat all Internet communications the same and not block, speed up or slow down any

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What Does the Digital Equity Act Mean for Cities?

Closing the digital divide in America is more than just an infrastructure challenge—it’s an economic one, too. Across the country, too many homes and businesses still don’t have access to adequate broadband infrastructure, and in many communities the infrastructure in place is not enough to ensure that all residents get to participate in the local economy.

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What Do Local Leaders Need to Know about the FCC Cable Order?

On August 1, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted 3-2 to approve a report and order that will make dramatic changes to cable franchises managed by state and local governments. The order, which will go into effect 30 days after it is published in the Federal Register, has two major components that will impact local

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How a Strong Digital Foundation Supported This Community’s Connections

Just 25 miles southwest of downtown Chicago, the Village of Orland Park is a municipality on the rise. Its population of 58,000 is expected to grow to 75,000 by 2030. Attention to infrastructure is critical for keeping operations in line with the increasing needs that accompany such growth. Over the last few years, Orland Park

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Top Ten Moments From Infrastructure Week 2019

The conversation around infrastructure in America has never been more urgent or relevant than it is today. As our nation approaches the finish line of the 7th annual Infrastructure Week, we wanted to take a moment to reflect on the action, advocacy and discussion we were fortunate to witness this week. Here are some of

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What a Broadband Preemption Victory in Arkansas Means For Rural Cities

For those of us lucky enough to live in areas with easy access to high-speed internet, it can be easy to forget: access to broadband is not created equal. For many in rural areas and even suburban communities, there might be very little or nearly non-existent internet access. More than connecting to Netflix, Facebook or

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Leadership in 2019: Why Cities Need to Rethink Digital Services

With changing technologies and higher constituent demands, cities and state leaders are trying to move faster to build more intimate and meaningful relationships with their constituents. There is pressure to deliver digital services more effectively as a result of online consumerism. Technological change is accelerating at an exponential rate due to industries built around innovation.

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Making Broadband Work in Marshall, Michigan

This is a guest post by Lisa Gonzalez, senior telecommunications researcher at The Institute for Local Self-Reliance. Marshall is home to about 7,000 people in south central Michigan and is seat of Calhoun County; the town is full of history. When it was time for Michigan to select its state capital, Marshall was considered a

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