Category: Advocacy

Why E-Book Access Matters

As digital technologies become more integrated into how people learn, work and interact, ensuring equal access to e-books is more important than ever. And yet, major publishers have changed the rules on e-book access for public libraries through highly restrictive new pricing and lending practices. Notably, Macmillan Publishers launched a new policy this month that

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Cities Lobby Congress on Substance Use, Mental Health and Homelessness

Every day cities, towns, and villages across the country face challenges posed by mental illness, substance use disorder and homelessness. An effective response by municipal leaders requires a comprehensive, multi-sector approach. On Wednesday, October 30, the National League of Cities held a briefing on Capitol Hill so that local leaders could tell Congress what they need,

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Leading Together: Putting Cities Front and Center in the Campaign for President

Cities are integral to the fabric of America. And with voters going to the polls for the 2020 presidential election in just about a year, our communities must be heard and the opportunities and challenges before us have to be amplified in the race for the White House. At a moment of deepening partisanship, we’re

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Proposed Changes to SNAP Will Have A Direct Effect on Cities’ Economic Development

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Nutrition Service has proposed a rule that would revise categorical eligibility for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formally known as food stamps. Specifically, the proposal would provide categorical eligibility only to those who have qualified for ongoing and substantial benefits from Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

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EPA, Army Corps Finalizes Repeal of Obama WOTUS Rule

On Sept. 12, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Army Corps) finalized a rule to repeal the 2015 Clean Water Rule. The 2015 Rule aimed to clarify which waterbodies are federally regulated under the Clean Water Act (CWA) and define which waterbodies are considered a “waters of the

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What Congress Learned from Miami Gardens

This Wednesday, I had the opportunity to represent my city, Miami Gardens, before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Subcommittee on Highways & Transit of the Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure. As the Chairman of our Miami-Dade County Transportation Planning Organization, I was asked by my Congresswoman Frederica Wilson to share our experience in fighting congestion

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Why Washington Should Invest in Community Development Block Grants

From large metropolitan centers to rural villages, investment matters. Even the tiniest of contributions in our communities can make all the difference. In low and moderate-income (LMI) areas, where private investment rarely flows without public incentives, federal investment can make all the difference. For many members of Congress, the question is not whether federal investment

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Unpacking the “Bridgegate” Case

Kelly v. United States is a conflux of fascinating law and facts. The basic question the Supreme Court will decide is whether the masterminds of “Bridgegate” have committed fraud in violation of federal law. The more technical question is whether a public official “defrauds” the government of its property by advancing a “public policy reason”

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What You Need to Know About the Supreme Court Census Ruling

Chief Justice Roberts joined his more liberal colleagues (Justices Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayor, and Kagan) concluding the reasons Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross gave for adding the citizenship question to the 2020 census were pretextual in violation of the Administrative Procedures Act (APA). Presumably, Secretary Ross will now be able to offer different reasons for why he

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Local Government May Keep Peace Cross SCOTUS Rules

The Bladensburg Peace Cross may stay, the Supreme Court ruled in a 7-2 decision in American Legion v. American Humanist Association.  According to Justice Alito, writing for the majority of the Court: “It has become a prominent community landmark, and its removal or radical alteration at this date would be seen by many not as

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