Category: Advocacy

House Passage of the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act Threatens Cities

On Wednesday, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a flawed and dangerous bill that will put our cities, law enforcement officials and residents at risk — and make our communities less safe. The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act (H.R. 38) will force states and municipalities across the country to disregard their laws and allow anyone to

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Tax Reform Continues to Race Forward

A lot has happened in the past month on tax reform. On November 16, the House passed its version of a tax bill, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (H.R.1), just under a week after the Senate released its own version of the bill. After a tenuous 20 hours of debate and deal-making, the Senate

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Trump’s Travel Ban Has Taken Effect. Now What?

The Supreme Court has allowed the third travel ban to go into effect at least temporarily while two federal circuit courts of appeals review decisions from lower courts temporarily blocking enforcement of the travel ban. Even if the government loses before the appeals courts the travel ban will remain in effect until the Supreme Court

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America’s Next Great Workforce Begins with Afterschool

This is a guest post by Richard Leadbeater, State Government Industry Manager at Esri. This week, the National League of Cities (NLC) is convening a symposium of mayors and corporate leaders to discuss and share their perspective on the workforce skills (that have been referred to as “soft skills” or social and emotional skills) gap —

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Three Reasons Why Net Neutrality Matters for Cities

On November 22, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai announced plans to roll back net neutrality regulations. The current regulations, which were adopted by the FCC in 2015, classified internet service as a “telecommunications service,” and required that all internet traffic be treated equally, without blocking, throttling (slowing down), or paid prioritization (so-called “fast

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Don’t Make Cities and Towns Shoulder the Cost of Tax Reform

This is a guest post by Sam Mamet, executive director of the Colorado Municipal League. Back in the day, when I was still lobbying for the Colorado Municipal League under the Gold Dome of our state capitol, there was an old parlor game I used to have to play. It was called “Shift and Shaft.”

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Six Things City Leaders Should Know About the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act

Yesterday, the House Ways and Means Committee released its long-awaited “Tax Cuts & Jobs Act” plan. The proposed tax reform plan aims to streamline the U.S. tax code and create some tax relief for middle and low income Americans by reducing the number of tax brackets, reducing marginal tax rates, and expanding family tax credits.

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Cities Can Tackle Hunger and Food Waste Through Collaboration

This is a guest post by NLC Board Member Priscilla Tyson, council president pro tempore, Columbus, Ohio. In this day and age, everyone should have access to healthy food. Unfortunately, that’s not the case in Columbus and Franklin County, Ohio. Nearly one-in-five children in my city of Columbus, Ohio, is food insecure. This mirrors statistics

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The Final Days of the Clean Power Plan

Earlier this year, it seemed like a certainty: The Supreme Court would hear arguments concerning, and rule on, the legality of the Clean Power Plan (CPP), a key component of the Obama legacy. Now, with the proposal of new regulations intended to rescind the CPP, Supreme Court review seems less and less likely. If there

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In Washington, Competing Forces Work to Reform Healthcare Markets

In Washington, news of the latest healthcare reform efforts seem to change by the hour. But it’s been a particularly productive week on the issue, as both Congress and the Administration made moves to implement competing agendas. Here’s a quick recap of what happened: On October 12th, the Trump Administration made two large announcements impacting

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