Author: NLC Staff

In Providence, Fighting Climate Change Starts With Racial Equity

Last week, NLC’s Shafaq Choudtry talked with Leah Bamberger and Monica Huertas of Providence, Rhode Island, to discuss how the city is proactively working with communities of color as a key strategy in combating the impacts of climate change. The city is one of the participants in NLC’s Leadership in Community Resilience Program. Leah Bamberger

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A “One Water” Future for America’s Cities

This is a guest post from Cynthia Koehler, Executive Director of the WaterNow Alliance and a session leader at City Summit 2017. If there were any doubts about the central role of local decision makers in ensuring sustainable communities and resilient water infrastructure, Irma and Harvey have put them to rest. Many have observed that water

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Why Natural Disasters Hit Vulnerable Groups Hardest

This is an NLC staff post by Bernadette Onyenaka and Chelsea Jones. Hurricane season is upon us yet again, and while nothing is ever certain, what does seem clear is that this is a hurricane season the U.S. will find hard to forget. If we are lucky, perhaps we will take the lessons that we

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Three Exemplary Design Projects for Civic Health

This is a guest post by Suzanne Nienaber of the Center for Active Design. Over the summer, the Center for Active Design (CfAD) introduced the Assembly Civic Engagement Survey (ACES), a groundbreaking study examining the relationship between place-based design and civic engagement. Through the CitiesSpeak blog series, we highlighted 5 key design strategies to support civic life,

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Senator George Voinovich on Public-Private Partnerships

This is a guest post by NLC President Matt Zone, councilmember, Cleveland, Ohio. As president of the National League of Cities, I’ve had the opportunity to connect with hundreds of other city leaders. I’ve come to understand just how many common values and challenges we share — and it has made me a better leader.

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NLC Equity, Education and Employment Summer Road Trip Jacksonville: Building Talent Pipelines and Pathways to Prosperity

This summer, we’ve embarked on a road trip to find out how six cities are building equitable pathways to postsecondary and workforce success. On our third stop, we discover how Jacksonville, Florida is building talent pipelines and sustainable pathways to prosperity. This post was co-authored by Dana D’Orazio and Audrey M.Hutchinson. This is the fourth

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Why America Should Invest in Afterschool and Summer Programs

This is a guest post by Mayor Karen Best of Branson, Missouri. As mayor of Branson, one of my primary responsibilities is ensuring the sustainability and prosperity of our community. There is no better way to ensure our city’s future than providing our young people with opportunities to learn and grow in a safe environment

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In Dayton, Building a 21st Century Workforce Starts With High-Quality Preschool

This is a guest post from Nan Whaley, Mayor of Dayton, Ohio. When I talk to citizens, the first thing they bring up is jobs –  jobs for themselves, jobs for their children. When I talk to business leaders, the first thing they bring up is workers – workers for today, workers for tomorrow. As

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How One City is Connecting Start-Ups and City Government

This is a guest post by Mayor Edwin Lee of San Francisco, California. During my nearly 30 years in government, I have been fortunate to work alongside countless hard-working, brilliant colleagues. The City of San Francisco flourishes because of the dedication, commitment and resolve of its 30,000 employees. While our talented workforce does great things

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Why Cities Should Support, Not Arrest, Homeless Youth

This is a guest post by NLC’s Lydia Lawrence. In America, young people who are homeless or face housing instability experience arrest and detention much more often than other youth. As many as 78 percent of the estimated 400,000 homeless youth in America have had at least one interaction with police and 44 percent have

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