Author: NLC Staff

Electric School Buses Make for a Safer Ride for Kids

This is a guest post by Matt Casale, transportation campaign director with the U.S. Public Interest Research Group. What do parents want when they put their kids on a school bus? Yes they want their kids to get to school on time, they want them to get along with the other kids or get more

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Making Shared Scooters and Bikes Successful in Your City

This is a guest post by Rachel Zack, Policy Strategist at Remix. Since Remix was founded, one of the most important questions we’ve asked is: “What problems can we help solve?” Answers to that question have always come from close communication with cities and transit agencies, helping us understand the complex challenges across transportation. We focused on

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Community Leaders Come Together to Build Networks of Opportunity for Child Well-being

The National League of Cities’ Early Childhood Success team joined Boston Medical Center’s Vital Village Community Engagement Network in Denver, Colorado for three days to kick off their Networks of Opportunity for Child Well-being (NOW) Learning Community. The learning community will support and build the capacity of local communities and coalitions to work together and

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DHS Public Charge Proposed Rulemaking Threatens Economic Vitality of Cities

On Thursday, November 29, the National League of Cities submitted comments in response to the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) notice of proposed rulemaking to expand the definition of a “public charge.” NLC has been active on the public charge issue for many years, including engaging with other state and local government organizations on the impact

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On Helping Teens Get Their First Jobs

This is a guest post by Trinh Nguyen, Director of the Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development (OWD) in Boston and Alicia Sasser Modestino, associate professor with appointments in the School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs and the Department of Economics at Northeastern University. The U.S. is currently experiencing its longest stretch of continuous monthly

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How Cities Can Step Up on Alzheimer’s: A 5-Step Agenda

This is a guest post by Maria Shriver, Founder, the Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement. At a time when Washington is gridlocked, cities are the places to get things done. Mayors and city councilmembers have stepped up to collaborate and solve real problems in the community – demonstrating democracy at its best. One of the biggest problems

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Why the Census is Headed To SCOTUS

For more on how to prepare your city for the 2020 census visit NLC.org/census. In March 2018 Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross issued a memorandum stating a citizenship question would be added to the 2020 census questionnaire. In In Re Department of Commerce the Supreme Court will not be deciding whether this question may be

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What Really Makes Cities Smart: Understanding the Citizen Experience

This is a guest post by Heidi Lorenzen, vice president of marketing for Accela. Cities are laboratories for democracy where residents can directly access their local elected leaders to make their concerns known. While federal regulation and legislation moves at a seemingly glacial pace, cities have to act nimbly and continuously evolve to maintain a

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What’s a First Tier Suburb, Anyway?

This is a guest post by Councilmember John Holman of Auburn, Washington. There is a good likelihood that you are an elected official from a first tier suburb. An older, less-used term is ring suburb. Simply put, if your city is influenced by a large, urban, metropolitan area, chances are you are one of us.

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Veterans and the Skilled Trades: The Future of Work

This is guest post by Bill Eller, vice president, business development at HomeServe. Skilled trades are the future of work. A combination of Baby Boomers reaching retirement age and lack of interest by young adults in the skilled trade field has caused an unprecedented labor shortage. It’s estimated that, for each person who enters the

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