Author: Heidi Cooper

ADA Requirements Affect Your City. This Webinar Will Show How Seattle and San Antonio are Rising to the Challenge.

On Thursday, Jan. 12, the National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families will host a webinar on how cities can comply with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements and improve outcomes for young adults with mental illness. Nationwide, cities and their partners continue to experiment with ways to avoid taking young adults

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Mass Incarceration Begins in Local Jails. Here’s How Cities Can Prevent Their Overuse.

Local jails detain 19 times the number of individuals of state and federal prisons combined – but cities have the power to reduce those numbers. In its most recent step supporting city leaders to reform the justice system, the National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families will launch a new initiative to

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NLC’s March Conference Will Educate City Leaders on Criminal Justice Reform

From Congress to City Hall, criminal justice reform has transcended politics and become a bipartisan issue in 2016. The high costs of incarceration, the toll it takes on both families and communities, and the nationwide breakdown in trust between police and the communities they serve are among the many factors that have driven increased interest

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How to Reduce Arrests of Young People in Your City

Missed our latest juvenile justice reform webinar? Not to worry, now you can watch and listen to Police Protocols to Reduce Arrests of Young People in Your City on YouTube. This webinar, which took place  on Friday, December 18, 2015, features Deputy Superintendent Michael Gropman of the Brookline, Massachusetts Police Department and Deputy Commissioner Kevin

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An Interaction with Police Doesn’t Have to Mean Detention for Young People

“Every interaction between police officers and our young people is, or can be, an opportunity for prevention or intervention.”   – Betsy Hodges, mayor, Minneapolis Decades of evidence support Mayor Hodges’ comment. Systems that overuse detention and other harsh corrections methods often make young people more likely to reoffend and in doing so, harm them, their

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