Reminding Washington That Cities Lead

Leading up to the 2017 Congressional City Conference in Washington, D.C., city representatives held 42 meetings this week with federal officials, working to build local-federal partnerships and tell Congress why city priorities will help to move America forward.

(NLC)

(clockwise from top middle) White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs Deputy Director Billy Kirkland addresses state league leaders; Maryland Municipal League President and Edmonston, Maryland, Mayor Tracy Gant and Maryland Municipal League Executive Director Scott Hancock meet with Senator Chris Van Hollen (D-MD); New York State Conference of Mayors President and White Plains, New York, Mayor Tom Roach and New York State Conference of Mayors Executive Director Peter Baynes meet with Rep. Tom Suozzi (D-NY); Mississippi Municipal League President and Magee, Mississippi, Mayor Jimmy Clyde and Mississippi Municipal League Executive Director Shari Veazey meet with Senator Roger Wicker (R-MS); State municipal league leaders descend on Capitol Hill for day of action. (NLC)

This post was co-authored by Carolyn Berndt, Angelina Panettieri and Ashley Smith.

State Municipal Leagues Join NLC to Advocate for Cities on Capitol Hill

This week, more than 35 executive directors and local leaders from 20 state municipal leagues across the country traveled to Washington, D.C. for an inaugural fly-in to advocate for city priorities on Capitol Hill and with the Trump Administration. At meetings and a briefing on Capitol Hill, state municipal league partners and NLC staff advocated for our top legislative priorities, including the tax exemption for municipal bonds, reinvestment in municipal infrastructure and e-fairness. Together we ensured that federal decision-makers heard loud and clear that local leaders are ready to build local-federal partnerships that will help to move America forward.

The fly-in began on Tuesday with a briefing hosted by NLC’s Federal Advocacy staff, which provided state municipal league executive directors and local leaders with an update on the new political dynamics in Washington, D.C., as well as substantive updates on NLC’s 2017 federal legislative priorities. NLC President Matt Zone, council member, Cleveland, and NLC Executive Director/CEO Clarence Anthony welcomed fly-in attendees to NLC’s office and spoke about the importance of advocating for cities during this time of change in Washington. In addition, Billy Kirkland, the newly appointed Deputy Director for the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs, addressed the state municipal league executive directors and local leaders and opened the door to future collaboration between the administration and cities.

On Wednesday, the state league leaders descended on Capitol Hill for a day of action to advocate for city priorities, including investments in municipal infrastructure and protecting municipal bonds, as well as introducing cities to newly elected members of Congress. In their time on the Hill, they met with more than 45 congressional offices across 15 states. Additionally, state league leaders and NLC staff met with staff directors of two key House committees to discuss issues important to cities – brownfields reauthorization and unfunded mandates – and with the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) Wireless Bureau to urge the FCC to avoid a one-size-fits-all mandate to preempt local authority on small cell wireless facility siting.

The day of action also included a briefing on Capitol Hill for senators, members of Congress and their staffs. Rep. Drew Ferguson (GA-3), a former mayor of West Point, Georgia, spoke at the briefing about the need for stronger federal-local partnerships.

Local Leaders Call on Congress to be a Partner to Cities

This Thursday, NLC hosted a Congressional briefing, “City Hall 101: The Role of Cities in Moving America Forward,” to urge members of Congress and staff to consider the best ways to partner with cities to solve some of the most pressing challenges of our time. With a focus on the economy, infrastructure and public safety, NLC President and Cleveland, Ohio, Councilmember Matt Zone opened the briefing by calling on Congress to support local efforts to combat public health crises like the opioid epidemic, to give city leaders a voice in how federal infrastructure dollars are invested, and to protect the tax-exemption for municipal bonds that helps cities invest in infrastructure to grow their local and the national economy.

“Cities are the builders of America’s infrastructure. We are the creators of economic opportunity for our residents. And we are leaders in finding creative solutions to the challenges facing our communities and our nation,” said Zone.

Rep. Drew Ferguson (R-GA), a former mayor of West Point, Georgia, and a newly-elected Congressman, spoke about his perspective of coming to Washington, D.C. after serving at the local level and the need for stronger federal-local partnerships. He spoke eloquently about the role of economic development and education in helping to move people out of poverty and into the middle class. In closing, Ferguson said, “The health of the nation can be measured by the health of our cities.”

Christy McFarland, NLC Research Director, discussed two recent NLC reports, City Fiscal Conditions and Paying for Local Infrastructure in a New Era of Federalism, which served as background on the health of city budgets, including revenue and expenditures, and the fiscal capacity of cities to be a partner with federal government. “City finances are stable. Cities are in a positive trajectory to growth, but city finances are vulnerable to economic swings. And the authority of local governments to raise revenue is often constrained,” McFarland said.

Council Member Zone was joined by Mayor C. Kim Bracey, York, Pennsylvania, and First Vice President of the Pennsylvania Municipal League, and Commissioner Gil Ziffer, Tallahassee, Flaorida, and First Vice President of the Florida League of Cities, to share experiences from their cities on some of the challenges they are facing at the local level.

Mayor Bracey and Commissioner Ziffer talked about the impact that homelessness has on their communities. In Tallahassee, the city utilized a public-private partnership to build a homeless shelter that provides other wrap around services including medical assistance, mental health services, and job retraining that has become a model for other cities in Florida.

Although York is a city of 43,000 and only 5.2 square miles, Mayor Bracey shared the city experiences the same kind of societal issues, good and bad, that larger cities face. While crime is going down and homeownership is up, homelessness, particularly among children, is a big challenge for the city. Programs like the Community Development Block Grant help the city leverage other public and private sector dollars to address the issues.

As the conversation turned to the topic of infrastructure, Councilmember Zone said that cities need a diverse array of financing options in order to improve our nation’s transportation and water infrastructure. While private sector financing is critical for cities in terms of increasing investments, Councilmember Zone said public-private partnerships might work for large projects, but it will not work for the types of Main Street projects that are needed in smaller communities nationwide.

(NLC)

(NLC)

Florida Local Leaders Travel to D.C. to Advocate for Federal Issues Impacting Cities

City officials from Florida traveled to Washington, D.C. this week to meet with members of Congress and advocate for key federal issues that affect municipalities.

The Florida League of Cities, led by FLC First Vice President Commissioner Gil Ziffer, Tallahassee and FAST Chair Mayor Joe Durso, Longwood, brought 28 members of the Federal Action Strike Team (FAST) and three staff members to meet with members of the Florida congressional delegation. The advocates first received a briefing from NLC’s Federal Advocacy team, then traveled to Capitol Hill. During their meetings on Tuesday and Wednesday, FLC FAST members advocated for the tax exemption for municipal bonds, federal infrastructure funding, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), the FEMA Public Assistance Program, and e-fairness legislation.

(NLC)

The Florida League of Cities FAST Strike Team visited Washington, D.C. this week to advocate for city priorities and attend a number of key meetings. (NLC)

State League Directors and City Leaders Talk Brownfields, Unfunded Mandates with Committees

During NLC’s State Municipal League Directors and Presidents Fly-In this week, local leaders met with staff directors of several House committees to discuss issues important to cities: brownfields reauthorization and unfunded mandates.

NLC President Matt Zone, councilmember, Cleveland, Mayor Harry Brown, Stephens, Arkansas, and President of the Arkansas Municipal League, Town Administrator Mel Kleckner, Brookline, Massachusetts, and President of the Massachusetts Municipal League, along with Arkansas and Massachusetts state municipal league representatives discussed with the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment the need to reauthorize the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Brownfields program. The committee, which shares jurisdiction over brownfields with the House Energy and Commerce Committee, is currently drafting legislation and will likely hold a hearing later this spring. NLC members voiced their support for addressing the local liability concerns and improving the flexibility of the program in the reauthorization bill.

Additionally, President Zone, Mayor Brown, Ken Wasson, Director of Operations for the Arkansas Municipal League, and Sam Mamet, Executive Director of the Colorado Municipal League, met with the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Intergovernmental Affairs Subcommittee to discuss how unfunded mandates place a burden on local governments, particularly small towns with limited financial resources. NLC leaders also discussed with committee staff how to ensure that the local voice is heard throughout the rulemaking process. Recently, NLC compiled feedback from local elected officials on unfunded mandates and regulatory reform proposals at the request of the committee. The committee will likely hold a hearing on these issues later this spring, and is seeking ongoing feedback from NLC and cities on how to reduce the burden on local governments.

State League Advocates Urge FCC to Respect Local Authority

In a meeting with the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) Wireless Bureau, advocates from the Georgia Municipal Association, Massachusetts Municipal Association, and League of Minnesota Cities urged the FCC to avoid a one-size-fits-all mandate to preempt local authority on small cell wireless facility siting. The meeting was held in response to a public notice published by the FCC in December that requested feedback on the current state of small cell deployment in cities.

The state municipal league advocates discussed the widely varying challenges faced by cities throughout the nation in working to improve wireless coverage for city residents, while preserving their residents’ rights of way, safety, and city planning priorities. They also shared their cities’ specific challenges, particularly the proliferation of excess or abandoned pole infrastructure in the rights of way, challenges in balancing repeated requests to site wireless infrastructure in densely populated cities, while neighboring rural towns lack service, and the difficulties for local planning officials to acquire adequate staff support for processing of unpredictable influxes of siting applications. The advocates also provided information about the great variation between their states’ respective laws on city authority in wireless siting.

About the authors:

Carolyn Berndt is the Program Director for Infrastructure and Sustainability on the NLC Federal Advocacy team. She leads NLC’s advocacy, regulatory, and policy efforts on energy and environmental issues, including water infrastructure and financing, air and water quality, climate change, and energy efficiency. Follow Carolyn on Twitter at @BerndtCarolyn.

Angelina Panettieri is the Principal Associate for Technology and Communication at the National League of Cities. Follower her on twitter @AngelinainDC.

 

Ashley Smith is the Senior Associate, Grassroots Advocacy at the National League of Cities. Follow Ashley @AshleyN_Smith.

The City of Wichita Leads the Way in Career and Technical Education

Competing in a global economy demands that we continue supporting manufacturing areas by providing skilled workers with certificates and degrees from qualified community and technical colleges.

(Getty Images)

A 2013 report by the Brookings Institution reported that the city of Wichita was one of three American cities which had the largest share of STEM jobs not requiring a four-year degree. (Getty Images)

This is a guest post by Mayor Jeff Longwell. This is the first post in a series about the Mayors’ Education Task Force.

As the mayor of Wichita, Kansas, I have seen the importance of investing in Career and Technical Education (CTE). At NLC’s recent Mayors’ Education Task Force meeting, I emphasized the role of local leaders in developing opportunities for youth and adults to gain meaningful employment in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) disciplines and technical industries. In Wichita, we have experienced the value of CTE as a conduit for rewarding careers in the fields of automotive maintenance and technology, advanced manufacturing, information technology, climate and energy control, and healthcare.

Wichita is known as the “Air Capital” of the world because of our expansive global aviation supply chain. Many of the early aviation pioneers came from, or have roots in, Kansas. This has enabled Wichita to also pioneer new technologies in advanced manufacturing, such as 3-D printing and robotics.

The specialized technical education required for these jobs often can be completed in a one- to two-year program. It is precisely these career technical education programs that are important to creating a successful and available workforce. Competing in a global economy demands that we continue supporting manufacturing areas by providing skilled workers with certificates and degrees from qualified community and technical colleges.

In 2013, the Brookings Institution reported that the cities of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Birmingham, Alabama, and Wichita had the largest share of STEM jobs not requiring a four-year degree. This report also found that half of STEM jobs do not require a four-year degree, although they pay 10 percent more on average than jobs with similar educational requirements. This knowledge has been a strength of our local economy for many decades, and it has helped build our industries and improve our citizens’ lives. Cities across our nation could benefit from increased access to quality credential programs and career pathways.

The state of Kansas recognized this several years ago and created scholarships that encourage people to obtain a variety of two-year technical certificates and degrees that help to grow our economy. The Kansas Department of Education prepares secondary students for this opportunity by using the National Career Cluster Model, grouping similar job skills into 16 fields of studies as Career Clusters. By developing structured career pathways, Kansas secondary students can access further education and employment opportunities right after high school graduation. The career pathways offered are developed in collaboration with business and industry leaders to ensure relevant and trade-worthy skills are embedded into the CTE secondary curriculum.

In Kansas, skilled automotive technicians who have completed a two-year education program can often earn six-figure salaries in the industry within the first few years of their career. Even with this reality, we see many industries and companies struggle to find people with the proper credentials and technical education to fill these jobs.

Here in Wichita, we are proud to have a leading example in our Wichita Area Technical College (WATC). This nationally-recognized technical college recently launched the Wichita Promise, a scholarship program that pays tuition and fees for training and certification for specific high-wage, high-demand jobs. Recently launched in 2016, the program works with local employers and provides personal career coaching and a guaranteed interview upon completion. WATC also works with our local high schools, providing students access to low-cost or free college and technical courses before students even graduate from high school.

In partnership with the new presidential administration and CTE advocates across the nation, I believe that adequate funding and marketing strategies can encourage education leaders, high school counselors, students and parents to explore a career and technical education pathway.

The critical requirement is that state and federal lawmakers support access to these opportunities and promote quality one- to two-year career technical education programs for adults and young people graduating high school. City leaders like myself have an important leadership role to play in guiding the momentum of our communities’ economic growth. With CTE, we can help employers find a ready and skilled workforce in our cities and improve citizens’ access to training and education, preparing them for quality, well-paying careers.

About the author: Mayor Jeff Longwell was elected to office in April 2015 and sits on NLC’s Mayors’ Education Task Force. He is a long-time resident of Wichita, having grown up in a west-side neighborhood and attended West High School and Wichita State University. Mayor Longwell began his community involvement as a member of the Board of Education at the Maize School, where his children attended school.

How Cities Can Support & Finance a Culture of Health

What does it take to ensure cities are healthier places to live, learn, work and play? A strategy that engages the right stakeholders.

(Getty Images)

Cities can create a Culture of Health by implementing a comprehensive approach that puts the health and well-being of all residents front and center. (Getty Images)

This post was co-authored by Kevin Barnett, Colby Dailey and Sue Pechilio Polis.

When leaders in local government, community development, and the health care system came together to develop a plan for rehabilitating a historic building – the Swift Factory in North Hartford, Connecticut – they viewed the building as a potential hub for community health.

Community Solutions partnered with the city, state, Saint Francis Hospital, and others to engage the community in dialogues about their health needs and concerns. Using resident feedback as a guide, they began the process of designing a building that will serve as a neighborhood hub for job creation, food production and health promotion. “We have the opportunity to reinvigorate one of the poorest communities in Connecticut,” said Rick Brush, CEO of Wellville and Director at Community Solutions. “Support from the city and state government was critical to bring together the collective vision, resources and innovative financing needed for success.”

Now more than ever – given tight budgets and fiscal constraints in cities – it’s critical for leaders and stakeholders to work together. Community anchor institutions such as hospitals are often one of the largest employers in communities and are essential partners in community health improvement efforts. Likewise, community development financial institutions (CDFI’s) also play a key role in financing strategies to improve neighborhoods and ensure better access in vulnerable communities to health improving resources, services and supports.

Here are two specific strategies cities can use to engage with these stakeholders:

Engaging Hospitals as Partners

The following strategies can help city leaders expand the depth and breadth of their existing relationships with hospitals to build healthier communities.

  1. Review Hospital Community Health Needs Assessments (CHNA’s). Give attention to how hospitals define their geographic communities (required by the IRS) and the degree to which their geographic parameters are inclusive of census tracts where poverty and associated health disparities are concentrated. In their analysis of population health dynamics, do they identify disparities by race and ethnicity only, or do they identify the communities where these populations are concentrated? An excellent public access tool to assist in the identification of these census tracts, hospital locations and other relevant factors is the Vulnerable Populations Footprint (VPF) tool.
  2. Compare CHNAs to Other Assessments. Review other assessments conducted by a variety of organizations (e.g., local public health agencies, United Ways, Community Action Agencies, Federally Qualified Health Centers) to identify opportunities for alignment of priorities and programs.
  3. Review Hospital Implementation Strategies (IS). Determine whether the programs outlined in the IS indicate a focus in communities where disparities are concentrated, or are they framed as “serving the community at large,” with broad dispersion of limited resources at the city, county or other broad geographic parameters. This provides an invaluable entry point for dialogue and analysis into ways in which resources of multiple organizations and entities may be better aligned and focused in order to produce a measurable impact.
  4. Focus on the Social Determinants of Health. Develop a matrix of priorities across organizations to identify potential alignment with city efforts to address various social determinants of health, including land use, affordable housing, food systems, transportation, planning with a focus on links to jobs, and livable wages.
  5. Build a Shared Sense of Ownership for Health. In an environment of increased transparency and public scrutiny, it is important to communicate an ethic of shared ownership for health in the engagement of hospital leaders. Communicate an interest in coming together to solve complex problems and optimally leverage the limited resources of diverse stakeholders including nonprofits, community development financial institutions (CDFI’s), city agencies, etc. Hospital leaders need to understand that the city and other stakeholders will be partners in the allocation of resources, including the development of public policies that offer the potential to scale and sustain positive outcomes.
  6. Build Capital to Support Community and Economic Development Projects. City leaders can set the tone for hospitals to consider investments in community infrastructure through tax incentives, loans, assistance with the permitting process, and informing development to ensure it meets the concerns of residents.

Engaging Community Development Financial Institutions

As city leaders look for ways to spur and leverage resources to ensure improvements in neighborhoods to promote improved health and safety, another key partner are Community Development sector actors, including Community Development Finance Institutions (CDFI’s) that bring investment capital and Community Development Corporations (CDC) that bring deep knowledge of a community needs and assets. The Community Development sector is in the leveraging business and can often help stretch limited resources through innovative financing including tax credits (e.g. new market tax credits), investment products (e.g. Healthy Futures Fund), and low-interest loans. As city leaders and staff consider outreach to local CDFI’s and CDCs, some good initial steps include:

Mayors, city leaders, hospitals and CDFIs can leverage and bolster each other’s efforts. By engaging with one another, identifying common ground, and collaborating across sectors, they can join forces to advance health equity and opportunity, creating communities where all people can live rewarding and healthy lives.

About the authors:

kevin-barnett-headshot_125x150Kevin Barnett, DrPH, MCP is a senior investigator with the Public Health Institute. Kevin has conducted applied research and fieldwork on two distinct but related issues: the charitable obligations of nonprofit hospitals and the diversity of the health professions workforce. Email him at kevinpb@pacbell.net.

colby_dailey-headshot-125x150Colby Dailey is the Managing Director of the Build Healthy Places Network and has worked for over a decade spearheading local, national, and global initiatives while cultivating and guiding cross-sector collaborations for collective measurable impact. Email her at cdailey@buildhealthyplaces.org.

sue_polis_125x150Sue Pechilio Polis is responsible for directing the health and wellness portfolio for the National League of Cities (NLC) as part of the Institute for Youth, Education and Families. Email her at polis@nlc.org.

As Cities Become ‘Smart’, Public Safety Looks to FirstNet for Priority Broadband

“FirstNet is the first effort I know of where cross disciplines – police, fire, EMS, mayors, city councils – have all been united.” -Tom Sorley, Deputy Chief Information Officer, Houston, Texas

(FirstNet)

FirstNet is developing the first nationwide public safety broadband network to provide first responders the advanced communication and collaboration technologies they need to help them do their jobs safely and effectively. (FirstNet)

This is a guest post by Ed Parkinson.

The term “Smart Cities” is a popular topic in today’s urban jurisdictions – but what is a Smart City? A Smart City has technological infrastructure which collects, aggregates and analyzes real-time data which it uses to improve the lives of its residents according to the National League of Cities, report “Trends in Smart City Development”. But beyond that, a Smart City partners with universities and the federal and private sectors in using technology to enhance the quality and performance of urban services. Innovation can improve city services – from finding energy efficiencies and reducing traffic to fighting crime and fostering economic growth.

The Department of Commerce recently recognized the potential of FirstNet to improve public safety services. In their January 2017 green paper, Fostering the Advancement of the Internet of Things, the Department said, “the FirstNet network will be an incubator and proving ground for public safety focused IoT solutions by linking more first responder data sources, such as their gear, emergency vehicles, fingerprint scanners, databases, and more.” Here are just a few innovations some cities are considering to enhance first responders’ ability to protect their communities:

  • Detailed surge maps to analyze patterns and display predictive outcomes for severe weather preparations;
  • Intelligent street lights to detect gunfire and alert authorities;
  • Subway platforms with embedded sensors to monitor and flag overcrowding;
  • Smart grids: embedded sensors for managing water, gas and electric services; and
  • Providing real-time information on traffic conditions to determine the fastest route to an emergency.

Some added benefits of these innovations include:

  • Directing the city’s first responders more precisely and efficiently to improve emergency response;
  • Managing technology and personnel more effectively by providing intelligent insight into areas where they’re needed most;
  • Increasing responders’ situational awareness and maintaining their safety during emergencies to speed up the decision-making process; and
  • Improve interagency communications and collaboration.

As urban planners and policymakers think about their cities becoming digitized and interconnected, a challenge will be ensuring investments are made to withstand the growth in Internet traffic. Increasingly, these technologies will depend on wireless broadband networks so cities can communicate securely, rapidly and with priority to their responders on the street.

Signed into law on February 22, 2012, the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act created the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet). The law gives FirstNet the mission to build, operate and maintain the first high-speed, nationwide wireless broadband network with priority dedicated to public safety. FirstNet will provide a single interoperable platform for emergency and daily public safety communications.

As FirstNet progresses in its mission to deploy a nationwide public safety broadband network, there will be many opportunities for policy makers and city officials to get involved and to make FirstNet a part of every Smart City.

The Smart City concept has grown to include at least 70 cities throughout the nation. The initiative includes federal grants in areas such as public safety, transportation, and disaster response. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) authorized $35 million in new grants last fall and over $10 million in proposed investments to build a research infrastructure for Smart Cities.  The National Science Foundation (NSF) also announced over $35 million in Smart Cities grants. FirstNet is ideal for bringing together the technology of Smart Cities to advance public safety.

Tom Sorley, deputy chief information officer for Houston, Texas, said FirstNet is “the first effort I know of where cross disciplines – police, fire, EMS, mayors, city councils – have all been united. Everybody’s come together and said, ‘We have to have this.’”

FirstNet is necessary to allow first responders to use the digital tools available to them on a reliable network, Sorley said. “This reduces risk. It makes the first responders and the citizens they serve safer. Data, more and more, is becoming that critical lynchpin in the service provision for public safety.”

Reid Vaughn, fire chief in Cuba, Alabama, agrees. “It’s often a challenge to get broadband services,” he said. “FirstNet will for the first time give us a mission critical, proprietary system. This will be a significant improvement for our rural communities. When everything is going wrong, this system is designed to keep going.”

Another key element to the efficiency of Smart Cities is the Internet of Things, which will extend Internet connectivity to items we use every day, such as light, electric switches and vehicles. Many in the public safety sector are looking forward to the ‘Internet of Lifesaving Things’ that will extend connectivity to responder gear such as body cameras and vehicles.

Key to making this all come together is collaboration between public safety agencies at the federal, state and local level, as well as public-private partnerships. Advances such as open data initiatives and the collaboration of research and technology to tackle key challenges – from fighting crime to providing shelter during a disaster – are most effective when working together.  Smart mobile technology, constantly driven forward by the marketplace, holds great promise for public safety as first responders strive to make communities safer. The National League of Cities, in its extensive work to share best practices used by Smart Cities, is a leader in this work.

First responders across the country will benefit from using next generation tools with prioritized, wireless broadband.  As cities continue to think about getting “smarter,” FirstNet hopes to work with them to be part of the solution.

To learn more and get involved, please visit FirstNet.gov and reach out to your FirstNet State Point of Contact (SPOC). You can also help by writing to your professional associations and ask them to pass a resolution in support of FirstNet, Following FirstNet on social media, and by writing a guest blog for FirstNet by contacting us at socialmedia@firstnet.gov.

ed_parkinson_125x150About the author: Ed Parkinson is the Director of Government Affairs at FirstNet.

Mayors Continue to Forge a Path Towards Greater Urban Resilience

Cities across the country are thinking of new ways to use resources and community assets to strengthen their response to numerous challenges presented by the on-going impacts of climate change and sea-level rise.

Last week, Shafaq Choudry was in West Palm Beach, Fl. representing the National League of Cities at Mayor Jeri Muoio’s State of the City Address where more than 800 community and business leaders gathered to hear city achievements in sustainability and a pathway forward on climate resilience. West Palm Beach is one of the ten cities participating in NLC’s Leadership in Community Resilience program, which launched in 2016. (Getty Images)

Last week, Shafaq Choudry was in West Palm Beach, Florida, representing NLC at Mayor Jeri Muoio’s State of the City Address, where more than 800 community and business leaders gathered to hear city achievements in sustainability and a pathway forward on climate resilience. West Palm Beach is one of the ten cities participating in NLC’s Leadership in Community Resilience program, which launched in 2016. (Getty Images)

2017 will be a year where local government leads the charge on urban resilience – and National League of Cities will be there to help. Through our Leadership in Community Resilience program, NLC provides assistance to 10 cities across the country that lack the financial and institutional resources, city-wide and cross-departmental collaboration, and internal capacity to implement their resilience goals. Designed to bolster city-led resilience initiatives and disaster preparedness, the program elevates local governments’ commitment towards a resilient urban future, no matter what is happening at the federal level.

These efforts were on full display in West Palm Beach last week at Mayor Jeri Muoio’s State of the City Address. Mayor Muoio focused on last year’s success as well as future plans to a vibrant crowd of 800 business and community leaders, elected officials, and residents. She highlighted how the city’s commitment to resilience and sustainability was rewarded with a 4-STAR rating – the only city to receive this certification in Florida. The city’s focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, equitable development, data collection, mobility, and increasing economic opportunities has successfully attracted partnerships with the National League of Cities, Knight Foundation, Bloomberg Philanthropies What Works Cities, Van Allen Institute and Gehl Design Studios.

Mayor Muoio’s sentiments are reflected in cities throughout the country where city officials are working to protect their communities from the recurring impact of climate change on infrastructure, housing, and businesses. The devastating impact of floods, hurricanes, droughts and other extreme weather consistently top news headlines and unlike national politics, weather holds no party affiliation. Building upward from a foundation set over the past eight years, city leaders are pushing disaster resilience initiatives into implementation.

Under former President Obama’s administration, the federal government restored the public’s good faith in disaster response from 33 percent after Hurricane Katrina to 75 percent after Sandy, according to Gallup. Over the course of eight years, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Administrator Craig Fugate dealt with 910 disaster declarations, more than any FEMA director in history. FEMA released an action plan in 2013, Crisis Response and Disaster Resilience 2030: Forging Strategic Action in an Age of Uncertainty, to address the gaps in emergency management and opportunities for capacity building. Hurricane Sandy triggered the federal government to shift their approach to disasters from a band-aid response to a holistic resilience planning.

Within three short years, shifts in disaster management and response from a federal to local level has empowered cities to think holistically and act strategically about urban resilience through programs such as the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities (100RC) and Rebuild by Design. Formerly a partnership with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Rockefeller Foundation partnered with the San Francisco Planning Department in light of a new Trump era, to launch Resilient by Design. Rockefeller Foundation awarded $4.6 million to the Bay Area to combat climate change and sea-level rise with a focus on providing multiple benefits to vulnerable populations.

Many cities outside the 100RC, Rebuild by Design, and Resilient by Design network are thinking of new and creative ways to use resources and community assets to strengthen their response to economic, environmental and social challenges presented by the on-going impacts of climate change and sea-level rise.

Although the cost of climate change is evident in global and financial centers worldwide, NLC has seized the opportunity to capture a compelling story of urban resilience efforts in small to mid-sized cities across the country through the Leadership in Community Resilience program. We are proud to support efforts like Mayor Muoio’s pledge to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and look forward to working with West Palm Beach and the other nine cities in our program throughout the year.

shafaq_choudry_125x150About the author: Shafaq Choudry is a Senior Associate with the Sustainable Cities Institute at the National League of Cities.

An Inside Look at How Cities Win Investment Projects

When a company chooses a location for a major relocation or expansion, the details behind the decision aren’t often divulged in the media. This new podcast gives listeners an inside look at the site selection process, and the stories behind how the location was selected and what it took to close the deal.

Downtown Reno, Nevada, where one of the podcast guests chose to locate their startup due in large part to the city's warmth and welcoming small business environment. (Getty Images)

Downtown Reno, Nevada, where one of the companies profiled in the podcast chose to locate their startup due in large part to the city’s welcoming small business environment. (DenisTangneyJr/Getty Images)

This is a guest post by Andy Levine and Patience Fairbrother.

In September 2016, Alorica, a California-based customer engagement company worth $2 billion with 92,000 employees across the country, announced plans to establish an 830-employee customer engagement center in Owensboro, Kentucky, marking the largest economic development project in the city’s history.

If you saw the announcement in the media, you probably read about the projected job numbers and heard glowing quotes from company and community officials. What the press release didn’t tell you, however, is that the project almost didn’t happen. In fact, the facility that the Greater Owensboro Economic Development Corporation (GO-EDC) originally intended for Alorica was exactly the opposite of what the company was looking for. It was, as Greg Bush, Divisional Vice President at Alorica, put it, “the same old thing.”

Closing the Deal

The story behind Owensboro’s successful but bumpy road to winning the investment was featured on an episode of “The Project: Inside Corporate Location Decisions,” a new podcast from Development Counsellors International (DCI) that gives listeners an inside look at how cities compete for corporate relocation and expansion projects. Every two weeks, the podcast features a recent corporate location decision and interviews with company executives, site selection consultants, and economic developers that reveal how the location was selected and what it took to close the deal.

 Greg Bush, Divisional Vice President at Alorica addresses a crowd in Owensboro, Ky., where the company announced plans to locate a massive customer engagement center. (photo: 44News)


Greg Bush, Divisional Vice President at Alorica, addresses a crowd in Owensboro, Kentucky, where the company announced plans to locate a massive customer engagement center. (photo: 44News)

The saving grace for the City of Owensboro, as the podcast revealed, was that the company’s project team fell in love with the city’s vibrant downtown, which Owensboro has spent more than $120 million to redevelop over the last seven years.

Greg Bush and consultant Jeff Pappas, Principal at E. Smith Realty, another key player in the project team, arrived in town the night before the site visit and instantly saw a place for Alorica downtown. The next day, they told Madison Silvert, President and CEO of GO-EDC, that they had to be downtown, or there was no deal.

Silvert, a bow-tie wearing lawyer turned economic developer, sprung into action to make the deal happen for the city. He called the owner of an old BB&T building downtown – a facility that he thought just might work for their significant size requirements – and set up a meeting for that day.

Lessons Learned

As Alorica tells it, Owensboro’s ability to switch gears and move very quickly to Plan B was what sealed the deal for the company.

This kind of detail – the kind that you don’t read about in a press release – is what makes “The Project” podcast unique. Seldom do city, state and economic development officials have the opportunity to hear directly from companies in a candid manner about the obstacles, pitfalls and turning points behind these complicated decisions – not to mention the “lessons learned” from their peers in the competition for jobs and investment.

In one episode which profiles Dana Incorporated’s decision to locate a $70 million manufacturing plant in Toledo, Ohio, the company reveals that, if the community hadn’t had the foresight to build a 100,000-square-foot spec building, the deal would have gone somewhere else.

In another, a women-run startup reveals that they chose Reno, Nevada, over locating in Silicon Valley because the Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada (EDAWN) went above and beyond to roll out the red carpet for the company during their visit. A key turning point for the project was a casual dinner where local business leaders joined the startup owners to talk frankly about the local business climate and their experiences operating there.

The Human Side of Corporate Location Decisions

An added bonus of hearing these stories directly from the key players involved is that it paints a more human picture of these seemingly inhuman, data-driven decisions. How does the project team celebrate when a major deal goes through? Madison Silvert says his first instinct was to go to church when he found out Owensboro had won the Alorica project.

In another episode, which features iCIMS’s decision to locate in a former research laboratory in New Jersey, the central characters make a deal to purchase a 30-year-old bottle of Macallan, which they joke will become a 31-year-old bottle if negotiations go on for much longer.

Ultimately, whether it’s over a bible or a glass of scotch, the characters featured on “The Project” have a happy ending and a wealth of insight for anyone dedicated to creating jobs and investment in their community.

andy_levine_and_patience_fairbrother_200x150About the authors: Andy Levine is the President and Chief Creative Officer of DCI and creator of “The Project” podcast. Follow Andy on Twitter at @DCI_Andy. Patience Fairbrother is a Senior Account Executive at DCI and producer of “The Project” podcast. Follow Patience on Twitter at @Patience_Fair.

Urban Parks Transcend National Politics

The benefits of public green spaces within, or accessible to, urban areas are much greater than are often immediately understood. Here’s how cities stand to gain from increasing access to parks.

The High Line is a public park built on an historic freight rail line elevated above the streets on Manhattan’s West Side. (Getty Images)

The High Line is a public park built on an historic freight rail line elevated above the streets on Manhattan’s West Side. (ferrantraite/Getty Images)

This is a guest post by Jaime B. Matyas.

As the nation seeks to unite after a contentious presidential election, areas of shared commitment should be prized and pursued. One of those areas is the increasingly important role of public lands in or near urban areas. President Donald Trump previously donated land in the New York City metropolitan area for a state park, and Hillary Clinton had called for the revitalization of more than 3,000 city parks within 10 years. Their actions highlight the value of public land and its growing importance in proximity to urban areas, and they could form the foundation for productive community engagement.

The benefits of public green spaces within, or accessible to, urban areas are much greater than are often immediately understood. They include, of course, the spiritual renewal that comes from experiencing the beauty of natural habitats, the joy of recreation, and the opportunity for relief from the daily stresses of life – but other benefits are even more profound.

Public parks have an extraordinary capacity to reveal individual passions for discovery and open up career opportunities. Monique Dailey, Youth Programs Manager for the Washington, D.C. Area at the Student Conservation Association (SCA), was 10 years old before she saw her first “real park” and says that she didn’t realize at the time that “it would be my salvation from the drugs and violence that were ravaging my community.” She became a Junior Ranger in the National Park Service, then a volunteer at the Rock Creek Park Nature Center, and finally an SCA crew member in Rock Creek Park before volunteering on a national crew at Salmon Challis National Forest in Idaho and interning for a summer. When it came time to apply for college, she had 750 volunteer service hours with SCA and a glowing recommendation to the Admissions Director.

AmaRece Davis had a similar experience in Homewood, one of Pittsburgh’s poorest neighborhoods. When two of his older brothers went to prison for murder, he saw himself “heading down that same dark path.” Then he got a break. He started working with the SCA, building trails, clearing brush and planting trees around Pittsburgh. That enabled him to join an SCA crew at Sequoia National Park in California, surrounded by giant sequoia trees.

“I sat at the base of one of these giants on my 18th birthday,” he writes, “and thought about all of my friends and relatives who had never been out of Pittsburgh and of others who hadn’t even survived to be 18. I came home a different person. I had found something larger than myself, figuratively and literally. I never used to care about litter, for example, and based on all the trash on the streets where I lived, neither did anyone else. When I got back from the West, I immediately organized a recycling program at Westinghouse High School and became known as Recycling Rece.” He has gone on to attend community college and complete several SCA internships, and recently became a Pittsburgh city park ranger.

The conservation of parks also provides skills that can enhance job and career opportunities. Research conducted by the renowned Search Institute revealed that SCA participants develop such valuable traits as “expressing ideas, engaging others to reach a goal, responsibility for the greater good, sense of purpose, openness to challenge, perseverance, awareness of their strengths and weaknesses, and more.” These skills all enhance one’s ability to succeed in life and in careers. That’s why it’s so important that urban residents as well as rural ones reap the benefits of America’s public lands.

At present, visitors to our national parks are, in the words of former Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, “older and whiter.” And a 2015 report by the Outdoor Foundation revealed that 73 percent of outdoor participants generally are Caucasian. But public parks can benefit all Americans – and a broadly diverse population can relate effectively to parks, which leads to more public support. Some methods that are valuable in broadening outreach in urban areas include the following:

  • Overnight Camp-Outs, which have been conducted by The White House and many governors in association with Great Outdoors Month with much success
  • Day Camps, which can provide single-day or week-long environmental education programs that introduce youth to nature-in-the-neighborhood as well as ways to be more ecologically friendly
  • Afterschool Programs, which can provide environmental education for younger children while engaging older youth in assisting with the program and with park restoration

When public parks and their conservation contribute so much to people and their communities, they are worthy of broader engagement and support – especially when so many young people need the work experience and career-enhancing opportunities that the conservation of parks can provide. In September, the unemployment rate for teenage youth (16 to 19 years old) was 15.8 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. At the same time, our national parks alone have a maintenance backlog of nearly $12 Billion.

Enhancing our nation’s parks and ensuring that their upkeep benefits everyone can become a point of community and national unification.

jaime_matyas_125x150About the author: Jaime B. Matyas is the president and CEO of the Student Conservation Association, the national leader in youth service and stewardship.

Improving Community Health in the Garden State

Guest author Deborah Levine shares with mayors and community leaders her city’s blueprint for coordinating better overall health outcomes in their communities.

The city of Trenton holds a weekly farmer’s market at Trinity Cathedral, a safe and accessible location for West Ward residents. (photo: New Jersey Health Care Quality Institute)

The city of Trenton holds a weekly farmer’s market at Trinity Cathedral, a safe and accessible location for West Ward residents. (photo: New Jersey Health Care Quality Institute)

This is a guest post by Deborah Levine.

New Jersey is geographically, economically and ethnically diverse. We are also diverse in terms of health outcomes. Life expectancy, for example, varies widely across the state, ranging from 73 years in Trenton to 87 years in neighboring Princeton Junction. So how do we address the varying health needs of our residents?

At the New Jersey Health Care Quality Institute, we help communities bring their resources and residents together to create healthier places for people to live and thrive, and our Mayors Wellness Campaign gives New Jersey mayors tools and strategies to champion healthy and active living. The Mayors Wellness Campaign celebrates its 10th anniversary this year, and serves over 380 mayors and communities across New Jersey.

A new and exciting project of the Mayors Wellness Campaign, supported by a three-year partnership grant with the United Health Foundation, allows us to work intensively with civic leaders and health care providers in three specific communities: Jersey City, Trenton, and Cumberland County. We are helping these communities address pressing health challenges identified in their Community Health Needs Assessments (CHNAs). CHNAs are created by tax-exempt hospitals every three to five years to monitor and improve community health outcomes. Here is our blueprint for mayors and community leaders to coordinate better overall health — a framework we believe can help any community.

Cumberland County offers free health screenings and healthy recipe ideas to residents. (photo: New Jersey Health Care Quality Institute)

Cumberland County offers free health screenings and healthy recipe ideas to residents. (photo: New Jersey Health Care Quality Institute)

The Blueprint

  • Read the CHNAs of hospitals in your community to identify pressing health challenges. As we looked at CHNAs from hospitals across New Jersey, the CHNAs from Jersey City, Trenton, and Cumberland County stood out, as each identified the need for improved health literacy and chronic disease management, and increased access to healthy lifestyle initiatives.
  • Connect with existing community partnerships. Through our work with Jersey City, Trenton, and Cumberland County, we focused on strengthening existing partnerships among public and private entities. In Jersey City we partnered with Jersey City Medical Center and the Jersey City Department of Health and Human Services. In Trenton we partnered with the Trenton Health Team. In Cumberland County we partnered with Inspira Health Network and the Cumberland County Health Department.
  • Identify community goals. Jersey City, Trenton, and Cumberland County are strikingly different from each another, and so are their health goals. Jersey City is the second largest city in New Jersey, and one of its top priorities is increasing access to healthy food. Trenton is the state capital and was once a major manufacturing center. One of its top priorities is to improve health literacy. Cumberland County is a large rural county that boasts sweet New Jersey produce, and is home to a large migrant farmer population. In 2010, Cumberland County was ranked 21st out of 21 New Jersey counties on the Robert Wood Johnson County Health Rankings and Roadmap. This sparked the creation of the Cumberland Salem Gloucester Health and Wellness Alliance, which prioritizes healthy corner stores and workplace wellness programs.
  • Invest in no-to-low cost sustainable programming. Jersey City, Trenton, and Cumberland County were all making strides in addressing health challenges, but with limited staffing and financial resources the sustainability of these programs was questionable. The Quality Institute’s Mayors Wellness Campaign supports educational opportunities for residents of Jersey City, Trenton, and Cumberland County, and funds educational materials in languages unique to each community’s populations. We have also formed a relationship with Aunt Bertha, a social services search engine, to create unique search engines for Jersey City, Trenton, and Cumberland County.
  • Maintain the momentum. Once you have identified the health needs of your community, establish ongoing partnerships with local champions like hospitals, health departments, and volunteers who can identify opportunities for health and wellness activities. Through the Mayors Wellness Campaign, the Quality Institute harnesses partnerships between civic and provider leaders in Jersey City, Trenton, and Cumberland County to drive change at the local level. It is through these partnerships that true change happens.
Jersey City conducts a supermarket education tour. (photo: Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop)

Jersey City conducts a supermarket education tour. (photo: Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop)

Healthy Partnerships

In response to recent CHNAs, Jersey City, Trenton, and Cumberland County are harnessing local partnerships and taking action by investing in their residents at a grassroots level. Jersey City Medical Center and the Jersey City Department of Health and Human Services partner to hold health fairs and educational supermarket tours. The Trenton Health Team partners with more than 50 local organizations including two hospitals, a Federally Qualified Health Center, and the City of Trenton Department of Health and Human Services to improve the health care experiences and outcomes of its residents. Inspira Health Network and the Cumberland County Health Department collaborate through the Cumberland Salem Gloucester Health and Wellness Alliance to improve community health education, physical activity, and chronic disease management among Cumberland County residents.

No two communities have identical health needs – but when municipal leaders and community providers join together and put forth a mighty effort to address the overall health of their residents, real advances become possible.

deborah_levine_125x150About the author: Deborah Levine is the Director of Community Heath at the New Jersey Health Care Quality Institute. In this role, Ms. Levine directs the Mayors Wellness Campaign, serving as a resource for mayors who wish to promote health and wellness initiatives in their towns.

Connecting the Dots: Leveraging Community Benefit Programs with City Leadership

 “When you look at maps of neighboring communities and ZIP codes and see significant disparities in life expectancy within a couple of miles – sometimes blocks – you’re compelled to advance policies to address those gaps in a meaningful way.” – Mayor David Baker of Kenmore, Washington.

Mayors and other city leaders address health issues every day, and they need a variety of strong partnerships to fully leverage the assets in their cities. (Getty Images)

Mayors and other city leaders address health issues every day, and they need a variety of strong partnerships to fully leverage the assets in their cities. (Getty Images)

This is a guest post by Nancy Zuech Lim and Sue Pechilio Polis. The post was originally published on Health Progress, the journal of the Catholic Health Association of the United States.

We know community benefit programs work with a variety of local partners, including faith-based organizations, nonprofits, local health departments, even other hospitals. But another type of critical partner is often overlooked: local city leaders.

Where we live, work, learn, grow, play and pray impacts our health and well-being. These, and the wider set of forces and systems shaping the conditions of daily life, are known as the social determinants of health. According to the World Health Organization, “conditions such as environment, housing, economy and policies impact the health and well-being of our communities.” Access to meaningful educational and economic opportunities vary by place and ultimately affect how long and how well we live – and mayors and city leaders play a pivotal role in ensuring access to those opportunities.

To be truly healthy, one not only needs high quality health care but also access to high quality early childhood programs, good schools, good jobs, affordable housing, safe and active transportation options, places to play, and healthy foods. Mayors and other city leaders address these issues every day, and they need a variety of strong partnerships to fully leverage the assets in their cities.

Hospitals and city officials can work together to address the social determinants of health and well-being through policy, structural and environmental changes in order to ensure sustainable improvements for city residents. Here are the steps they can take on three different levels:

  1. Individual and family level: build awareness of healthy behaviors, address barriers, and support ways that basic needs can be met.
  2. Neighborhood and community level: build communities that decrease barriers to ensure the healthy choice is the easy choice in every neighborhood.
  3. Policy level: promote policies that support healthy choices and healthy behaviors. Because community benefit programs are moving beyond hospital walls, the time is ripe for hospitals to further align efforts with city leaders and departments. Conducting Community Health Needs Assessments (CHNAs) together to identify priority health needs and develop implementation strategies is one way for hospitals and city leaders to build a fruitful and ongoing partnership. Some hospitals already are collaborating with city leaders and other community partners. A few examples:
  • Baton Rouge, Louisiana Mayor Melvin L. “Kip” Holden, through his Healthy City Initiative, brought together area hospitals such as the Baton Rouge General Medical Center, Lane Regional Medical Center, Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, the Surgical Specialty Center of Baton Rouge, and Woman’s Hospital to conduct a joint CHNA and implementation strategy, putting them on a course for greater collaboration to address systematic issues that influence health.
  • Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System municipal leaders and community partners took a holistic view of health in South Carolina and worked together to address all health indicators, including education, housing, access to healthy food, and economic stability. Together, they won the 2015 Robert Wood Johnson Culture of Health Prize in recognition of their progress in making changes that led to improvements in the health and well-being of local residents.
  • Vincent Hospital Frankfort in Indiana works with city and county leaders and community partners as part of the Healthy Communities of Clinton County Coalition. The coalition works to improve health through policy, system and environmental changes, complete streets and tobacco-free programs.
  • The D.C. Healthy Communities Collaborative is a local partnership among four District of Columbia hospitals (Children’s National Health System, Howard University Hospital, Providence Health System and Sibley Memorial Hospital), four Federally Qualified Health Centers (Unity Health Care Inc., Community of Hope, Mary’s Center and Bread for the City), and two ex-officio members (the D.C. Primary Care Association and the D.C. Hospital Association) that conducted a joint CHNA in the nation’s capital. In collaboration with the D.C. Department of Health, the collaborative is developing an implementation strategy to address the priority health needs in the District of Columbia.
  • Saint Thomas Health, Nashville, Tennessee, collaborates with Metro Nashville Public Schools to provide the Saint Thomas Health Scholars Program, a free program for selected high school seniors to promote health care careers through mentoring and training for the medical assistant certification exam.
  • Trinity Health, based in Livonia, Michigan, created the Transforming Communities Initiative that uses a wide variety of funding mechanisms for direct community health improvement in awarded locations.

Further examples of health systems working with city leaders to address affordable and healthy housing are: Bon Secours Baltimore Health System, Saint Agnes Healthcare in Baltimore, Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, and Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C.

Successful efforts in this arena start by developing key partnerships that include city officials. Here are a few tips for community health care organizers:

  • Share with your mayor/city leaders. Share your CHNA, implementation strategy and community benefit report with your mayor, councilmembers, local school superintendent, and health department director. Offer to provide key city officials with an overview of your CHNA process, community benefit programs, and the community support you provide.
  • Know your city’s plans and priorities. Become familiar with your city’s master plan, school wellness plan, and health department plan. Listen to your mayor’s State of the City address. Lincoln, Nebraska’s “Taking Charge” program is an example of a city using its budgeting process to improve community health and well-being. The program uses an outcomes-based budgeting and evaluation process that identified community priorities and set outcome goals.
  • Meet and discuss. Meet with city leaders to learn more about their efforts to improve health and well-being. Share and discuss how social determinants affect the health and well-being of your community. Consider using key resources like County Health Rankings & Roadmaps and Community Commons to map by ZIP codes the areas of greatest need. Highlight areas of focus that overlap and initiatives that complement city goals.
  • Assess together. Share information and assessment processes. Consider working towards one needs assessment for the city, and look for other ways you may be able to collaborate and leverage resources.
  • Align efforts to improve health and well-being. Build on each other’s strengths and expertise, and work together to address barriers to healthy lifestyle behaviors, health care and the social determinants of health. Look for ways your programs and efforts may support each other’s goals and initiatives.

Interested in learning more about social determinants of health? Click here to view a short video by Julie Trocchio, senior director, community benefit and continuing care, in CHA’s Washington, D.C. office.

About the authors:

nancy_lim_125x150Nancy Zuech Lim is a community health and benefit consultant with the National League of Cities on the Institute for Youth, Education and Families’ Early Childhood Success portfolio. She can be reached at lim@nlc.org.

 

sue_polis_125x150Sue Pechilio Polis is the Director of the Health and Wellness team in NLC’s Institute for Youth, Education and Families. She can be reached at polis@nlc.org.