Author: Carolyn Berndt

Water Resources Bill is a Win for Cities

This week, Congress sent the president a comprehensive bipartisan water infrastructure bill. America’s Water Infrastructure Act (S. 3021) passed the House by voice vote and passed the Senate by a vote of 99-1. In a tense political climate leading up to the mid-term elections, the strong support for the bill in both chambers shows that

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Improving Water Supply and Aging Infrastructure in Atlanta

This summer, as Congress works to advance targeted infrastructure bills like the Water Resources Development Act, cities across the country are continuing to call on Washington to build on these efforts and to commit to rebuilding our nation’s infrastructure in partnership with the nation’s local elected officials. During Infrastructure Week in May, city leaders took

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Water Infrastructure and Workforce Development Supporting the Bay Area

This week, as part of Infrastructure Week 2018, city leaders are convening in Washington to advocate a strong federal-local partnership to invest in our nation’s infrastructure. It’s a crucial time to tell federal leaders in Washington about the local needs, challenges and innovative solutions around infrastructure. From water systems to broadband networks and workforce development, infrastructure

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NLC Members Tell Congress: Rebuild and Reimagine America’s Infrastructure

The truth is simple: America needs investment in infrastructure. Local governments face challenges around water, transportation and broadband infrastructure, as well as workforce development — and the result impacts our economy significantly. Last week, NLC hosted a congressional briefing to highlight our guiding principles for infrastructure investment. Local leaders traveled to the U.S. Capitol to call on

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How Can Cities Become More Disaster Resilient?

Three historic hurricanes. Wildfires in the West. Increased frequency nuisance flooding and heavy rainfall. As extreme weather continues to dominate the headlines, in 2017 what can city leaders do to protect their communities? Last week, NLC and the Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI) co-hosted a Congressional Briefing entitled “How Can Cities Become More Resilient

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In Washington, NLC Leaders Represent City Priorities

For Washington, DC, August is a quiet month. With Congress in recess and the President typically on vacation, the federal government has a chance to hear from constituents and work on long-term plans and issues. For NLC’s Federal Advocacy Committees, however, that pause in the action is golden opportunity. This week, over three dozen city

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Five Things City Leaders Should Know About the Paris Withdrawal

After President Donald Trump announced Thursday that the U.S. will withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, hundreds of city leaders spoke out to denounce the decision. From New York to Pittsburgh to Dubuque, Iowa, mayors and councilmembers pledged to oppose the withdrawal, work on alternative actions, and continue to address climate change in their own

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Presidential Candidates: Here’s What You Should Learn from Flint, Michigan

Using the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, as a case study, here are three reasons why the presidential candidates need to pay attention to and address city priorities. As the Republican and Democratic candidates took to the debate stage in South Carolina last week, they attempted to persuade voters, particularly those in the upcoming early

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Climate Impacts on Water: Going to Extremes

Climate change is introducing new challenges and risks, and exasperating existing ones. Getty Images Extreme weather events, extreme drought and extreme flooding are among the impacts that climate chance is and will have on water quality and availability in cities. According to the latest U.S. Drought Monitor Report, 30 percent of the contiguous United States

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Protecting Federalism: Still the Battle Cry of Cities

The year 1995 was a time of “reinventing government,” with both the Clinton Administration and the new Republican majority Congress pledging to streamline government, balance the federal budget, and shift policy responsibilities to states, local governments and the private sector. Fundamental questions about the roles and responsibilities of government took center stage in Washington. One

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