Author: Andrew O. Moore

Getting to One Million – and Beyond

Last week’s initial meeting of the Opportunity Youth Network, a group of funders, corporations, the National Council of Young Leaders, and national organizations including NLC, provided an opportunity to confront a pressing national challenge:  how to reconnect one million of  the nation’s seven million “opportunity youth” with education and employment over the next two years. 

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Dropout Reengagement Surges in Washington State

With a May 20 statewide meeting among representatives of 88 school districts, community colleges, community-based organization partners, and the City of Seattle, Washington State surged into new prominence in the national dropout reengagement field. In one way, Washington stands in a place of its own, since the passage of Washington House Bill 1418 and the establishment of

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Dropout Reengagement Moves Forward in Los Angeles

The City of Los Angeles and the LA Unified School District as close working partners: who would have predicted this in the midst of bitter struggles over mayoral leadership of schools a few years ago? Yet, it’s this partnership, and more, that I witnessed this week on a visit to the Boyle Heights Tech Center

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Nineteen Million

Sometimes a single number shakes me in my boots – a budget line, a murder rate, a grant amount. Currently, the number “rocking my world:” Nineteen million. Nineteen million is the number of young adults who will qualify for relatively low cost health insurance under provisions of the Affordable Care Act.  That’s about half of

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Violence Prevention Efforts in California Cities Continue Strong Despite Challenges

Ten California cities — nine longtime participants in a statewide gang prevention network, plus newly added Long Beach — gathered a few weeks ago to share practices and develop a 2013 policy agenda.  Despite prevailing challenges such as resumed high rates of violent crime, significant turnover among mayors, chiefs of police, city councils, and diminished police forces, and fewer resources than

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Angels on Ice!

The worlds of city economic development and youth development came together for a brief shining moment last week, at the LA Live! entertainment complex in Los Angeles.  Dense new residential and commercial development in and around the complex brings verve and people well into the evening, many nights each week. With oversize statues of LA

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Dropout Reengagement Network Progress & Challenges

This week’s convening of the NLC Dropout Reengagement Network in Denver provides a chance to recognize progress in a rapidly growing field – and acknowledge key challenges going forward. Perhaps most notably, the Network that meets this week is twice as extensive as it was last year. It’s inspiring to see additional cities start centers, including Dubuque and Davenport,

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Financing Postsecondary Success

Most city policy and thought leaders can agree on the importance of increasing postsecondary credentialing rates, in the context of broader economic, workforce, and talent development strategies.  Many cities are knocking on NLC’s door asking, “how to?” Strive’s Collective Impact approach is spreading, and typically embraces postsecondary success goals and indicators. But, communities are only

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From Miracle to PACT

Two words notably missing from the Building Peace in Boston mobile workshop of the 2012 NLC Congress of Cities: Miracle, and Ceasefire. Twenty years ago, Boston and indeed the nation celebrated a community-police collaboration that brought the number of youth homicides to zero for two years running. Some called this the Boston Miracle; some called

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Education Re-engagement Centers Spreading

This week, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa unveiled a new network of 13 “YouthSource Centers.”  These centers constitute the latest addition to similar one-stop dropout recovery efforts now operating in cities as varied as Davenport, Iowa, and Boston, Massachusetts.  Based on evidence of significant numbers of youth and young adults who have not finished high school

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