Month: February 2015

Why We Host the Congressional City Conference in March

Colorful rowhouses near the Shaw neighborhood of Northwest D.C. (Getty Images) We host our annual Congressional City Conference in March for a number of reasons. Most importantly, March is when Congressional action begins to take place. Before March, new members are likely to still be figuring out the ropes; after March, you’ll find that many

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President Obama’s “Every Kid in a Park” Initiative: Connecting Kids to Nature and History

Two developments last week provide opportunities for cities to connect young people to the outdoors and to local history. The President’s new Every Kid in a Park initiative will help city leaders develop and expand strategies for getting more young people outdoors and connected to our national parks. (Getty Images) For some children, spending time

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LED Street Lights: Energy Savings Likely to Outweigh Initial Costs for These Three Cities

LED streetlights, such as those found on the Lowry Avenue Bridge in Minneapolis, Minn., can provide better visibility while reducing emissions and cutting cities’ energy bills by more than 60%. (Joe Ferrer/Getty Images) Nearly every boulevard, avenue, road or side street in America is lined with opportunities to reduce energy consumption and save important municipal

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Mayors’ Challenge Seeks to Create Safer Walking and Bicycling Networks

Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx issued the Mayors’ Challenge for Safer People, Safer Streets to improve safety for pedestrians and bicyclists over the next year. Mayors who commit to creating safer, more connected walking and bicycling networks in their cities will be invited to attend the Mayors’ Summit for Safer People, Safer Streets on March

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Cities Can Still Help Children and Families Get Health Insurance

“It doesn’t matter why people don’t have insurance; what matters is that we help them get it.” -Valerie McDonald Roberts, City of Pittsburgh (Getty Images) Although the 2015 deadline to enroll in health insurance through the Affordable Care Act’s Healthcare Marketplace has passed, there are still ways for children and families to get covered. Depending

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Open Data Is Finally Making A Dent In Cities

This post originally appeared on Fast Company’s Co.Exist blog. Open data can help you find your lost dog, make your commute more efficient, and make government more transparent – if cities will let it. (Getty Images) What is the best way to get from 12th Street to Main, and should I take the subway, a

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Don’t Ask, Do Tell: NLC Joins SCOTUS Amicus Brief in Religious Accommodation Case

Do you think employers should ask job applicants about the clothing they might wear for religious reasons? Or should applicants disclose their religious accommodation needs without being asked? (Getty Images) Traditional HR policy practices hold that employers shouldn’t ask prospective employees about protected characteristics such as age, sex, race, national origin, religion, etc. However, the

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Supreme Court Rules Correctional Institutions Must Allow Half Inch Beards for Religious Reasons

The Supreme Court’s opinion in Holt v. Hobbs communicated a rather pragmatic view of the prison security risks created by short beards – namely, that the beards aren’t much of a risk at all given that they are not an ideal place to hide contraband. (Getty Images) To the casual Supreme Court watcher, Holt v.

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We Helped U.S. Communities Give 500 Backpacks to These Students in Need

The National League of Cities was represented at the recent U.S. Communities annual meeting and charity event by David Maloney, Program Manager, Strategic Partnerships and Emma Lieberth, Program Manager, Strategic Partnerships. U.S. Communities is the only national purchasing cooperative sponsored by NLC, the National Association of Counties (NACo), the Association of School Business Officials International

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Incarceration as Usual? The MacArthur Foundation Doesn’t Think So

Nearly 12 million people are sent to local jails every year – and 75 percent of those in jail are incarcerated for nonviolent offenses such as traffic, property or public order violations. The number of people currently incarcerated in the United States is equal to the combined populations of Los Angeles and New York City.

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