Month: December 2014

Cities Can Help Close the Meal Gap on Weekends and Holidays

City agencies can serve meals and reach more children by utilizing existing resources. (Getty Images) During the weekends and holidays, many of us look forward to spending quality time with our family and friends, and much of that time is spent around the dinner table. It is important to remember, though, that many children and

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Supreme Court Accepts Affordable Care Act Case

Last month, the Supreme Court’s docket went from boring to big with the grant of just one case: King v. Burwell. The issue in this case is whether tax credits for low and middle income health insurance purchasers are available under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) if insurance is purchased on a federal exchange rather than a

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This Case Isn’t (Only) About a Confederate Flag License Plate

If it were displayed on a specialty license plate, would you consider the image of a Confederate flag to be an expression of government speech or private speech? (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles) In Walker v. Texas Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans, the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles Board rejected the Texas Division of the

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State of the Reengagement Network in 2014 and Beyond

Opening the 2014 Reengagement Plus convening in Portland, Oregon last week, I observed that the Reengagement Network deserves a moment of quiet celebration. Quiet because of recent tragic events in several communities directly affecting youth; celebratory because collectively, we have had a tremendous impact this year. (Getty Images) In my opening remarks, I outlined how

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Supreme Court Rules No Pay for Passing Through Security Screenings

The Supreme Court has ruled that these employees are not required to be compensated for their time spent submitting to security screenings at work. (Getty Images) Jesse Busk and Laurie Castro worked at warehouses filling Amazon.com orders. Their employer, Integrity Staffing Solutions, Inc., required its hourly workers to undergo a security screening before leaving the warehouse each

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First (Only?) Environmental Case of the Supreme Court’s Term is a Big One

This coal-fired power plant is excited to receive its 15 minutes of fame when the Supreme Court rules on a complex environmental case later this term. (Getty Images) The consolidated cases of Michigan v. Environmental Protection Agency, Utility Air Regulatory Group v. Environmental Protection Agency and National Mining Association v. Environmental Protection Agency challenge a 2012 Environmental Protection Agency

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Must All Signs Be Treated the Same?

Update: the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for this case on Monday, January 12, 2015. Municipal codes treat signs differently, meaning that spray-painted signs like this might not be allowed to remain in your neighbor’s yard for longer than necessary. (Getty Images) The Supreme Court’s decision in the case of Reed v. Town of Gilbert,

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Why the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Reauthorization Act Matters to Cities

The National League of Cities’ new guide for city-led juvenile justice reform outlines steps that cities can take ahead of three key proposed changes in the recently introduced federal juvenile justice bill. (Zora Murff) Last week, Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) and Senator Charles Grassley (R-IA) introduced the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Reauthorization Act of

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The Kids are Alright: The Need for City-Led Juvenile Justice Reform

A new resource is available for city leaders committed to increasing public safety and improving youth outcomes through juvenile justice reform. NLC’s Institute for Youth, Education, and Families (YEF Institute) also recently announced the selection of six cities to receive technical assistance for juvenile justice reform projects. NLC’s new Municipal Action Guide (MAG), Increasing Public

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