What Does It Take To Undo Historical Wrongs? Louisville Finds Out.

What began as a project by local urban planner and community organizer Joshua Poe quickly became a critical tool for understanding the interplay between the city’s history and its current outcomes. An interactive storymap created by Poe demonstrated how redlining and other real estate policies impacted the ability of communities of color to access jobs and

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Don’t Run Out of Money: Why Annuities Matter

Running out of money in retirement is a major concern for many American workers. The phenomenon is dubbed longevity risk because of the potential danger of exhausting one’s assets before death. A core objective of any retirement plan should be to provide lifetime income insurance in the form of an annuity, which provides pension benefit

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Permits and Pollution: Next Steps for the Clean Water Act

If a state or local government discharges a pollutant from a point source to a navigable water it must obtain a permit under the Clean Water Act (CWA). But what if that pollutant is conveyed in something—say groundwater—between the point source and the navigable water? Must the state or local government still obtain a permit?

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Making Broadband Work in Marshall, Michigan

This is a guest post by Lisa Gonzalez, senior telecommunications researcher at The Institute for Local Self-Reliance. Marshall is home to about 7,000 people in south central Michigan and is seat of Calhoun County; the town is full of history. When it was time for Michigan to select its state capital, Marshall was considered a

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Supreme Court to Review Census Citizenship Question

In April the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case that will determine whether a citizenship question will appear in the 2020 census. A decision in Department of Commerce v. New York is expected by the end of June, in time presumably to include or exclude the question from the print version of the

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Help Your Gig Workers File Their Taxes Right

The sharing economy, also commonly referred to as collaborative consumption, the collaborative economy, the gig economy or the peer-to-peer economy, has been a growing phenomenon in the United States job market. This relatively new trend is made up of contractors and freelancers, who are independent from the company that they work for. This line of

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Why Now Is the Right Time for Congress to Rebuild with Cities

On Thursday, February 7th, Mayor Eric Garcetti of Los Angeles, California testified before the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. The following is a selected set of excerpts from the Mayor’s testimony at the infrastructure briefing: “The Cost of Doing Nothing: Why Investing in Our Nation’s Infrastructure Cannot Wait”. The greater Los Angeles region –

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To Ames, With Love

Wondering why the National League of Cities is feeling so much love this Valentines Day? Learn more at nlc.org! Dearest Ames, I’m so happy to call you my adopted hometown. You know that when we first met back in 1991, I wasn’t impressed. As I drove through town on the way to meet my soon-to-be husband’s

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To Portland, With Love

Wondering why the National League of Cities is feeling so much love this Valentines Day? Learn more at nlc.org! My Dearest City, As an adopted child, I could have ended up anywhere in the world. But for some lucky reason, my Portland, Maine family chose me. You helped me grow and make me the man I

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