Why the Workforce Act Matters — Part I

This is the first in a series on the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) and the belief by the National League of Cities (NLC) that Congress must reauthorize and modernize the Act to ensure that it meets the needs of today’s workers and employers. In this first blog we will explore the foundation of the program, which is commonly referred to as the local public-private partnership (which includes local business leaders and local city and county elected officials), the one-stop system, and how these translate programmatically at the local level.

Over the next five weeks, NLC will publish other blogs that will address the kinds of job training that WIA programs offer, the impact that these programs have on workers and employers, some examples of effective programs, the kinds of changes to WIA NLC can and cannot support, and what members of the Human Development Committee are doing to ensure that the Congress is aware of city elected officials legislative wants and concerns.

Why the Workforce Investment Act Matters — Part I

By Neil Bomberg

Every year, the federal government invests billions of dollars in the nation’s workforce development system. Among the programs funded is the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) which provides training and employment services to millions of unemployed, underemployed and disadvantaged Americans through a national network of one-stop career centers that are governed by local workforce investment boards and city and county elected officials.

When WIA became law in 1998 it included a completely new and innovative approach to delivering workforce development services. One-stop career centers have become the backbone of a seamless employment-services delivery system in every state. These one stops are operated and governed at the local level by local workforce boards, comprised of business leaders, and city and county elected officials. They make up the public-private partnership for which this program is known.

The one-stops have provided workers and employers alike with access to the full range of employment services that have included job placement assistance, training, credentialing, unemployment benefits and career guidance, as well as access to other relevant government services, including 17 types of federal training and education programs. Over the past several years, these one-stop centers have successfully provided upwards of nine million Americans per year with employment assistance and millions of employers with skilled workers.

Most of the nine million Americans who enter the WIA system receive “core services” which are generally described as job search and job placement assistance, labor-market information, workplace counseling, and preliminary skills assessments. Others receive “intensive services” which are generally described as comprehensive skills assessments, group counseling, individual career counseling, case management, and short-term pre-vocational services, such as how to write a résumé and prepare for an interview. Both of these services are designed to help those looking for work and who have employable skills, find a job quickly. A smaller number receive “job training services.” These are designed to provide WIA clients with industry-recognized skills so that they may obtain employment, especially after core and intensive services do not result in finding a job.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s